main
community
contact staff ecs twitter facebook
Teaching QualityHighly Qualified TeachersSelected Research & Readings (Additional Resources)
 
  TEACHING QUALITY
 HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS
 
 What States Are Doing
 Selected Research & Readings
 




Race to the Top: Promising Approaches to Achieving Teacher-Related Goals (Goal 3) MS Word PDF - (Jennifer Dounay, Education Commission of the States, March 2009)...

ECS Paraprofessional Policy Brief - The Education Commission of the States (ECS) convened a panel of distinguished professionals in multible facets of the paraprofessional field in late September 2005 to address the challenges states are facing and must face in the near future. The outcome of this meeting included suggestions for districts and states. These recommendations are contained in this outline policy brief....

From Highly Qualified to Highly Competent Paraprofessionals: How NCLB Requirements Can Catalyze Effective Program and Policy Development Guidelines from the ECS Paraprofessi PDF - This brief is intended to help policymakers understand the issues states face in helping paraprofessionals not only meet NCLB requirements and become “highly qualified,” but highly competent as well. (Marga Torrence Mikulecky and Angela Baber, Education Commission of the States, December 2005)...

NCLB and Highly Qualified Teachers: Where We Have Been and Need To Be MS Word PDF - This ECS Issue Brief links ECS research in the two critical areas of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) – teaching quality and teacher working conditions in hard-to-staff schools. The paper offers recommendations on how to more effectively administer and implement NCLB, and proposes that targeted efforts be made to assist teachers in hard-to-staff schools reach the requirements of the law. (Jennifer Azordegan and Charles Coble, Education Commission of the States, 2004)...

No Child Left Behind & Teaching Quality: A 50-state Perspective of Policy Implementation - Presented to the Colorado Association for Teacher Educators, this PowerPoint reviews: (1) state definitions for highly qualified teachers, (2) subject-matter competency requirements, (3) high-quality professional development and (4) the role of teacher educators in helping teachers become "highly qualified." (Education Commission of the States, 2004)...

Initial Findings and Major Questions About HOUSSE MS Word - The “high objective uniform state standard of evaluation,” or HOUSSE, is a key component to the definition of a highly qualified teacher. It is a system through which existing teachers can demonstrate knowledge of their subject area without necessarily having to undertake further training or take a test. This policy brief summarizes initial findings and trends from ECS' state policy HOUSSE database. (Jennifer Azordegan, Education Commission of the States, January 2004) ...

NCLB: Implications for Early Learning PDF - The goal of this brief is twofold: (1) to inform early learning educators and policymakers better about specific NCLB components, and (2) to begin to discern what implications – both positive and negative – NCLB holds for the early learning field. It includes sections on adequate yearly progress, highly qualified teachers, and reading and literacy. (Kristie Kauerz and Jessica McMaken, Education Commission of the States, June 2004)...

Training for Paraprofessionals: The Community College Role PDF - This report discusses the community college role in meeting No Child Left Behind requirements for paraprofessionals. It includes information on credentialing, state examples, formal assessments, policy challenges and policy recommendations. (Gina Shkodriani, Education Commission of the States, December 2003)...

Highlights of the U.S. Department of Education Guidance on the Teaching Quality Provisions MS Word - From defining "full State certification" to explaining which factors a state should consider when developing its High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE) procedures, this document lays out the information in the revised draft of Improving Teaching Quality, Non-Regulatory Guidance. (Jennifer Azordegan, Education Commission of the States, November 2003)...

No Child Left Behind and Highly Qualified Teachers: Three Big Questions Educators Should Ask MS Word PDF - According to this brief, the questions reporters should be asking are: (1) How has my state defined a "highly qualified" teacher? (2) How can schools be expected to accurately report on the percentage of "highly qualified" teachers, and how can schools really learn more about the qualifications of particular teachers? (3) What are the different kinds of teacher qualifications, and do these different levels of licensure assure qualified teachers are in our nation's classrooms? (Charles R. Coble and Jennifer Azordegan, Education Commission of the States, October 2003)...

WANTED: A National Manpower Policy for Education MS Word - This paper urges the federal government to create a national education manpower program to meet the ambitious goals of having a "highly qualified" teacher in every classroom, as required by the No Child Left Behind Act, and of narrowing the achievement gap between disadvantaged and advantaged students. The paper's blueprint is modeled heavily on the federal government's medical manpower programs, as well as successful teacher programs in states such as Connecticut and North Carolina and in school districts such as New York City and San Diego. This paper is one of eight in a series exploring the appropriate federal, state and local roles in a number of areas (including standards, assessment and accountability and school choice) in light of the states-rights provisions of the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. (Linda Darling-Hammond and Gary Sykes, Education Commission of the States, July 2003)...

NCLB FAQ: Do State Teacher Certification Processes and Policies Need To Change To Fulfill No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Requirements? PDF - Policymakers will have to ask and answer many questions regarding state-level interpretation and implementation of the provision in NCLB that all teachers be "highly qualified." This article outlines such questions for policymakers, regarding new and substitute teachers, as well as current teachers and discusses examples of state actions addressing this provision. (Charles Coble, TQ Update, Education Commission of the States, December 2002)...

NCLB FAQ: How Will States Define "Highly Qualified" Teachers? PDF - No Child Left Behind underscores the important role teacher quality plays in student achievement. The legislation requires that new teachers hired after the start of 2002-03 in programs supported by Title I, Part A, be "highly qualified" and all teachers, both new and existing, teaching in core academic subjects be "highly qualified" by 2005-06. These requirements will challenge states to examine their current teacher certification processes to determine their compliance with the law, and ensure all teachers have mastery of their content areas. This article outlines the decisions states must make in defining highly qualified teachers and provides examples of state actions. (Charles Coble, TQ Update, Education Commission of the States, December 2002)...

NCLB FAQ: How Will States Ensure They Can Report Accurately on the Percentage of "Highly Qualified" Teachers? PDF - No Child Left Behind requires states to publish an annual report disclosing the professional qualifications of teachers, the percent working with emergency or provisional credentials and the percent of classes in the state not taught by "highly qualified" teachers. To meet this goal, states will need to do many things, including carefully defining the term "highly qualified" and putting a data-collection and reporting mechanism in place. This article discusses the requirements of this annual report, as well as steps states have already taken to meet the goal. (Charles Coble, TQ Update, Education Commission of the States, December 2002)...

No Child Left Behind Policy Brief: Teaching Quality PDF - In order for states to get a high-quality teacher in each classroom, they must (1) examine their teacher recruitment and certification processes, (2) ensure teachers have subject-content mastery and paraprofessionals meet standards, and (3) promote ongoing professional development. This policy brief presents implications for states and key policy questions around these issues. (Twanna LaTrice Hill, Education Commission of the States, April 2002)...

The Secretary's Fifth Annual Report on Teacher Quality: A Highly Qualified Teacher in Every Classroom - This annual report on teacher quality presents the data collected by states from postsecondary institutions, alternative route teacher preparation programs, testing companies and the states’ own accountability systems. The 2005 data reported by the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the outlying areas show both progress toward the nation’s goal of a highly qualified teacher in every classroom and areas where work is needed to make improvements. (U.S. Department of Education, 2006) ...

Days of Reckoning - Many low-income and minority students are assigned less-qualified teachers than their more affluent or white peers. NCLB was meant to ensure that every student was taught by a qualified teacher. This report highlights the "dismal" record of the federal government in getting compliance from states on implementing the teacher quality provisions of NCLB and makes several recommendations to increase pressure on states for improvements in the coming academic year. (Phyllis McClure, Dianne Piché and William L. Taylor, Citizens Commission on Civil Rights, July 2006) ...

Selected Tables from the: 2003-04 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) PDF - Access SASS tables that detail: (1) percent of schools that used various methods for covering vacancies, of schools that had teaching vacancies for the current school year; and (2) percent of districts that required selected criteria when considering teaching applicants, both by selected school district characteristics. Full report available here. (Gregory A. Strizek, Jayme L. Pittsonberger, Kate E. Riordan, Deanna M. Lyter, Greg F. Orlofsky and Kerry Gruber, National Center for Education Statistics, March 2006)...

Key Policy Letters Signed by the Education Secretary or Deputy Secretary - States that do not reach the goal of having a highly qualified teacher (HQT) in every class by the end of the 2005-06 school year will not lose federal funds if they are implementing No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and making a good-faith effort to reach the HQT goal as soon as possible. This letter explains the steps that states need to take, and the actions the U.S. Department of Education will take to confirm that a state is making a good-faith effort in this area. (Margaret Spellings, U.S. Department of Education, October 2005)...

Meeting NCLB Goals for Highly Qualified Teachers: Estimates by State from Survey Data - This article presents results of survey data showing teacher qualifications for their assignments that are comparable from state-to-state, as well as trends over time. The analysis is intended to help state leaders, educators and others obtain a picture of highly qualified teachers in their state, and to be able to compare their state statistics with states across the nation. Since states have some flexibility in meeting the standard for highly qualified teachers outlined by No Child Left Behind, this analyses may be useful as a common benchmark for use by states as they develop their own state-specific definitions and measures. Blank, Rolf, Doreen Langsen, Elizabeth Laird, Carla Toye and Victor Bandeira de Mello, Education Policy Analysis Archives, vol. 12, no. 70, December 20, 2004.) ...

The Secretary's Third Annual Report on Teacher Quality - This is the third report to Congress on the state of teacher quality nationwide. Chapter One deals with this challenge within recently enacted provisions. Chapter Two details activities the Department of Education and other organizations have undertaken over the last year to support the raising of academic standards for teachers, while at the same time reducing unnecessary barriers to teaching. Chapter Three provides a snapshot of state progress in dealing with the teacher quality challenge, and Chapter Four concludes the report with a description of forthcoming teacher quality-related initiatives at the Department designed to assist states in meeting the NCLB requirement that all teachers of core academic subjects are highly qualified. (U.S. Department of Education, July 2004)...

Additional Assistance and Better Coordination Needed among Education Offices to Help States Meet the NCLBA Teacher Requirements - The Government Accountability Office investigated states’ implementation of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) teacher quality requirements in special education. While all states demanded special education teachers hold a bachelor’s degree and be certified within the state, only half require teachers to demonstrate competency in core academic subjects. The report cites confusion among state education officials about how to apply the competency requirements and a concern over lack of funding to implement structural changes. It also documents confusion over the differences between NCLB and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, specifically, which law takes precedence in special education related matters. Finally, the report suggests the U.S Department of Education clarify special education teacher requirements and that the Office of Special Education Programs become more involved in helping states meet the NCLB teacher requirements. (Government Accountability Office, July 2004)...

Secretary's Letter to Chief State School Officers Outlining New Flexibility for Teachers - This letter from U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige to chief state school officers outlines the new flexibility for states and districts in meeting No Child Left Behind's highly qualified teacher provisions. (U.S. Department of Education, March 2004)...

New No Child Left Behind Flexibility: Highly Qualified Teachers - In March 2004, the U.S. Department of Education announced three policies to provide flexibility for teachers to demonstrate they are highly qualified. The policies target rural teachers, science teachers and current multi-subject teachers. (U.S. Department of Education, March 2004)...

No Child Left Behind Act: More Information Would Help States Determine Which Teachers Are Highly Qualified - This study surveyed 50 states and the District of Columbia and a nationally representative sample of districts about their plans to implement the highly qualified teacher provisions of NCLB. It found that states did not have the information needed to determine whether all teachers met the criteria and that data systems to track teacher qualifications for each core subject they teach were often nonexistent. The report recommends that the Secretary of Education provide more information to states, especially on ways to evaluate the subject-area knowledge of current teachers. (U.S. General Accounting Office, July 2003)...

Roles for Education Paraprofessionals in Effective Schools - Offering policymakers and program planners an overview of strategies that can enhance the contributions of paraprofessionals, this report also offers approaches to thinking about school effectiveness and whether investments in hiring or training paraprofessionals are the best way to help learners. (U.S. Department of Education, 1997)...

Title I Paraprofessionals: Non-Regulatory Guidance - All paraprofessionals hired after January 8, 2002, and working in a program supported with Title I, Part A funds must have: (1) completed two years of study at an institution of higher education; or (2) obtained an associate’s (or higher) degree; or (3) met a rigorous standard of quality and be able to demonstrate, through aformal State or local academic assessment, knowledge of and the ability to assist in instructing, reading, writing, and mathematics (or, as appropriate, reading readiness, writing readiness, and mathematics readiness).This guide address commonly asked questions about paraprofessional qualifications. (U.S. Department of Education, March 2004)...


Selected Research & Readings Current

Print Friendly and PDF

4

Thank you, Issue Site Sponsors
pearson

 
Home  |  About ECS  |  Education Issues A-Z  | Research Studies  |  Reports & Databases  |  State Legislation  |  State Profiles  |  Projects & Institutes  |  Newsroom  |  Website User's Guide


Information provided by ECS combines the best of the most recent and useful research available. Should you have questions, please contact our Information Clearinghouse at 303.299.3675.

700 Broadway, #810 Denver, CO 80203-3442
Phone: 303.299.3600 | Fax: 303.296.8332
 
©2014 Education Commission of the States
www.ecs.org | ecs@ecs.org
Read our privacy policy