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Final Rules and Non-Regulatory Draft Guidance: A Compilation MS Word - This table contains links to final rules and non-regulatory draft guidance issued by the US Department of Education for No Child Left Behind. (Education Commission of the States, October 2004)...

No Child Left Behind Policy Brief: School and District Leadership PDF - The No Child Left Behind Act both reflects and reinforces a major shift in thinking about the roles and responsibilities of school board members, district superintendents and principals. This policy brief discusses the challenges facing leaders, opportunities for leadership development, and state policy trends and questions. (Katy Anthes, ECS, April 2002)...

No State Left Behind: The Challenges and Opportunities of ESEA 2001 MS Word PDF - ECS' detailed summary of No Child Left Behind also looks at states' readiness to implement provisions of the law and provides key questions for policymakers to consider. (Education Commission of the States, February 2002) ...

ECS Special Report -- A Closer Look: State Policy Trends in Three Key Areas of the Bush Education Plan: Testing, Accountability and School Choice MS Word PDF - In a follow up to an initial report, Building on Progress: How Ready Are States To Implement President Bush’s Education Plan?, ECS provides a more detailed look at three major elements of the Bush proposal. (Education Commission of the States, April 2001)...

No Child Left Behind--2008: Summary of Final Title I Regulations - The reforms introduced into the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 fundamentally changed the way that states and districts approach the challenge of educating all students to achieve high standards. These final regulations respond to the lessons learned from six years of implementing these reforms and build on the advances states have made with their assessment and accountability systems. (U.S. Department of Education, 2008)...

Educational Architects: Do State Education Agencies Have the Tools Necessary to Implement NCLB? PDF - The second report in a series, this report examines the capacity of state education agencies to carry out No Child Left Behind requirements. The analysis identifies four major challenges: staffing and infrastructure limitations, inadequate funding, insufficient guidance and barriers within state education agencies. Follow this link in order to access appendices. (Angela Minnici and Deanna D. Hill, Center on Education Policy, May 2007)...

Private Schools: An Action Guide for Parents and Communities - Since the passing of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) in 1965, private school students have had access to federal funding for secular education services through a provision called the "child benefit theory" which allows private and religious school students to receive funding of services under Title I without violating the church-state provisions of the First Amendment. NCLB has made some changes from the original ESEA. This brief focuses on the following major NCLB provisions related to private school student participation: student eligibility; equitable funding; role of the local school district; parent involvement; assessment of private school students; and bypass provision. (Public Education Network, July 2006) ...

No Child Left Behind: A Road Map for State Implementation - This publication from the U.S. Department of Education provides a blueprint to achieve the goals of No Child Left Behind. It describes how the Department. The Road Map breaks down NCLB into clear principles and it demonstrates the variety of methods being used to turn those principles into action. This document will help states and local educators understand what the department expects as it reviews state policies and considers alternate policy options and flexibility for implementing specific requirements of NCLB. (U.S. Department of Education, 2005)...

No Child Left Behind [NCLB] Spring 2005 Implementation Update - This brief: (1) examines how states are progressing with the implementation of NCLB; (2) identifies the basis of the criticisms from educators and state officials; (3) summarizes NCLB changes and additions recently proposed by the Bush administration; and (4) shares the perspectives from six national and state education leaders on the current status and future of NCLB. Included policy perspectives are written by Tom Houlihan, Jack Jennings, Frederick M. Hess, John Ellis, Lowell Rose and Amy Cook-Lurvey. (Jonathan A. Plucker, Terry E. Spradlin, Kyle P. Cline and Kathryn M. Wolf, Center for Evaluation & Education Policy, Spring 2005)...

Working Smarter to Leave No Child Behind: Practical Insights for School Leaders - The authors provide a primer on various facets of the NCLB accountability model — including content standards, assessments, adequate yearly progress, reporting, technical assistance — and then examine the underlying conditions necessary to making each component work. They offer numerous recommendations for making NCLB as effective as possible, grouped under the umbrellas of (1) building capacity; (2) using standards to improve instruction; (3) using assessment results to improve instruction; (4) creating effective incentives; (5) helping parents make effective choices; and (6) going beyond the accountability data. One recommendation: design the state testing system to be resistant to score inflation. (Brian Stecher, Laura Hamilton and Gabriella Gonzalez, RAND, 2003) ...

Improvements Needed in Education's Process for Tracking States' Implementation of Key Provisions of NCLB - This report contains recommendations for improvements needed in the Department of Education's process for tracking states' implementation of key provisions of No Child Left Behind (NCLB). To provide information about states’ efforts, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) determined (1) what goals states established for student proficiency and their implications for whether schools will meet these goals; (2) what factors facilitated or impeded selected state and school district implementation efforts; and (3) how the Department of Education supported state efforts and approved state plans to meet student proficiency requirements. The GAO recommends that the Secretary of Education delineate a written process and timeframes for states to meet conditions for full approval, develop a written plan with steps and timeframes so all states have approved standards and assessment systems by 2006 and further support states’ efforts to gather accurate student data used to determine if goals have been met. (Government Accountability Office, September 2004)...

Additional Assistance and Research on Effective Strategies Would Help Small Rural Districts - Smaller districts are having a hard time attracting highly qualified teachers, according to this study on implementing the No Child Left Behind Act. Teachers often must teach multiple grades or subjects and feel isolated from big libraries, professional development and programs for special-needs students, the report said. Declining enrollments mean less state aid but higher standards require more resources. Also, special-needs and disadvantaged students make up a bigger percentage of the students in smaller districts. (U.S. Government Accountability Office, September 2004)...

Academic Atrophy: The Condition of the Liberal Arts in America's Public Schools - This report is based on a study of K-12 students’ access to a curriculum in the liberal arts, especially in light of No Child Left Behind and state accountability requirements. The authors found strong evidence of growing commitment to mathematics, reading, writing, science and secondary social studies. They also saw evidence, however, of waning commitment to the arts, foreign language and elementary social studies, with the greatest erosion of the curriculum occurring in schools with high minority populations. (Claus von Zastrow and Helen Janc, Council for Basic Education, March 2004) The Council of Basic Education closed its doors in June 2004, therefore, ECS has provided an alternative link....

Conference Papers: Implementing the No Child Left Behind Act - Panelists at an April 2003 conference on implementing No Child Left Behind (NCLB) were each invited to submit a short document providing recommendations to policymakers on state and local capacity to implement the accountability, technical assistance, school choice and teacher quality provisions of the act. The present compendium of papers includes these, as well as Marc Tucker's introductory essay, "The Issue of State Capacity." Penned by policy analysts and state and local education leaders alike, the papers provide general guidelines for sound NCLB policy responses, as well as in-depth information on the context and policy activities in a handful of specific districts and states. (Co-sponsored by the National Center on Education and the Economy, the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation and the Progressive Policy Institute, April 2003)...

Rolling Up Their Sleeves - This report examines the attitudes of public school leaders about their jobs and the challenges they face. The authors found that school leaders say their biggest headaches are funding and the time it takes to comply with a blizzard of local, state and federal mandates. Some 93% of superintendents and 88% of principals say their district has experienced "an enormous increase in responsibilities and mandates without getting the resources necessary to fulfill them." Almost nine in 10 call No Child Left Behind an "unfunded mandate," and most say the law "will require many adjustments before it can work." A summary of selected findings also is available. To download a free copy of the full report, a brief registration is required. (Steve Farkas, Jean Johnson and Ann Duffett with Beth Syat and Jackie Vine, Public Agenda, 2003)...

The Future Federal Role: Observations and Ideas - This paper, excerpted from a book, examines federal education policy trends over the last 30-some years, and No Child Left Behind in particular, to propose areas where the federal government might wade into in coming years, maintain or expand its existing role. The author also suggests ”What Will Not Happen,” and offers recommendations for improving the federal legislative and administrative structures relating to education. (Christopher T. Cross, Policy Perspectives, WestEd, excerpted from Political Education: National Policy Comes of Age by Christopher T. Cross, Teachers College Press, 2003)...

No Child Left Behind: A Desktop Reference - This Desktop Reference outlines what is new under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 for each program supported under the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965 and other statutes. It also describes how the act's four guiding principles (accountability, flexibility and local control, parental choice, and what works) are brought to bear on many of these programs. The intent is to provide a substantive overview of policy changes and emphases for state and district officials. Programs for which no funding was requested in fiscal years 2002 and 2003 are not included. (U.S. Department of Education, September 2002)...

Proposed Rulemaking for Title I - The Secretary of Education's proposed regulations apply to programs administered under Title I, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), and reflect changes made under No Child Left Behind. The proposed regulations cover the following topics: student standards, assessments, accountability, report cards, reading/literacy, migrant students and at-risk students. (U.S. Department of Education, August 6, 2002) ...

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) Summary - This CRS Issue Brief for Congress provides a concise summary of the major provisions of the reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act. (Wayne Riddle and James Stedman, CRS, December 31, 2001)...

Comparability: An Elusive Goal - This article provides a historical description of the federal government’s approach to establishing comparability of student achievement across states. Although comparability is appealing to federal lawmakers, traditionally there have been problems with establishing it – largely because equating and/or linking different state tests is not technically feasible. Achieving interstate comparability is not likely because of how much different tests vary in the content and skills they test, the conditions under which they are administered, and the incentives that are attached to test performance. (J. Herman, E. Baker and R. Linn, CRESST, Spring 2001)...


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