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Remediation (K-12)


No Child Left Behind Act: Education Actions Needed to Improve Implementation and Evaluation of Supplemental Educational Services - NCLB requires districts with schools receiving Title I funds that have not met state performance goals for three consecutive years to offer low-income students enrolled in these schools supplemental educational services (SES), such as tutoring. This report discusses early implementation of SES, including: (1) how SES participation changed in recent years, (2) how providers work with districts to deliver services, (3) how states monitor and evaluate SES and (4) how the U.S. department of education monitors and supports SES implementation. The report recommends that the department of education clarify guidance and disseminate information on promising practices, consider expanding flexibility and clarifying state authority over program design and collect information on district SES expenditures and provide evaluation assistance. Also available are report highlights. (U.S. Government Accountability Office, September 2006) ...

No Child Left Behind Act: Education Actions Needed to Improve Local Implementation and State Evaluation of Supplemental Educational Services - NCLB requires districts with schools receiving Title I funds that have not met state performance goals for three consecutive years to offer their low-income students supplemental educational services (SES), such as tutoring. This report examines: (1) how SES participation changed between school years 2003-04 and 2004-05; (2) how SES providers are working with districts to deliver SES; (3) how states are monitoring and evaluating SES; and (4) how the U.S. department of education monitors and supports state implementation of SES. The report recommends that the department of education disseminate information on promising practices used to improve SES implementation, provide states with technical assistance to improve evaluation of SES' effect on student achievement and expand program flexibility where appropriate. Also available are report highlights. (U.S. Government Accountability Office, August 2006) ...

Supplemental Educational Services Evaluation for the New Mexico Public Education Department - The primary objective of the 2004-2005 Supplemental Educational Services (SES) evaluation was to determine if students who received services, as required under No Child Left Behind made academic progress. In addition, the evaluation was to determine if vendors were meeting the conditions of their contractual agreements. The evaluation included on-site visits, which was supplemented with data on parent and teacher satisfaction. A database also was developed to record progress data and analyze student progress by individual vendor. The evaluation identified shortcomings of the programs, such as inadequate reporting, communication and responsiveness by the vendors, and offered recommendations to improve the supplemental services. Since the evaluation did not conduct a controlled study, the data gathered could not differentiate the cause of any student progress, which was evidenced, credit was given for any academic improvement without knowing the source.(Center for the Education and Study of Diverse Populations, 2005) ...

Mandating Supplemental Intervention Services: Is New York State Doing Enough to Help All Students Succeed? - This study examines the content and implementation of New York state’s policy requiring Academic Intervention Services (AIS) to be provided to every student achieving below grade-level proficiency. Findings are reported on numerous areas, including how students were identified for program participation and exit, percentage of students participating, who staffs AIS programs, when and where AIS services were offered, and if/how AIS instructional strategies differed from regular classroom practices. The authors also analyzed whether specific practices were more or less common in wealthy communities, in higher-achieving districts or in districts posting greater performance gains since implementation of the new Regents standards and AIS regulation. The authors conclude, “With some caveats, the AIS policy mandate has encouraged local districts to adhere to guidelines promoting near universal policy response of providing supplemental instruction for eligible students.” (Kieran M. Killeen and John W. Sipple, Education Policy Analysis Archives, March 2005)...

Letter from the U.S. Department of Education to Illinois Officials Regarding Supplemental Services - The U.S. Department of Education asked the Illinois State Board of Education to investigate and take the steps necessary to ensure the Chicago School District is properly implementing the Supplement Educational Services (SES) provisions of No Child Left Behind. The department noted that Chicago is functioning as an SES provider even though it has been identified by the state for improvement, an arrangement that is prohibited under the federal law. In addition, Chicago issued two memoranda to potential SES providers proposing minimum service hours and predetermined maximum reimbursement amounts, which the district does not have the authority to impose....


What States Are Doing Current

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