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For-Profit Degree Granting Institutions Database - A searchable database of information relating to for-profit degree granting institutions of higher learning in the United States. (Tunde Brimah, Education Commission of the States, 2001)...

Highlights from the National Forum on Education Policy -- Growth in "For-Profit" Higher Education Institutions Examined MS Word - July 19, 2001 – During a panel discussion at The National Forum on Education Policy, three leaders in the provision of “for-profit” education programs discussed the role of their institutions in addressing evolving higher education demands -- David Moore, president and chief executive officer of Corinthian Colleges, Inc.; Laura Palmer Noone, president of the University of Phoenix; and Ronald L. Taylor, president and chief operating officer of DeVry Inc. (Education Commission of the States, July 2001)...

Meeting Needs and Making Profits: The Rise of For-Profit Degree-Granting Institutions MS Word - The rapidly growing for-profit sector of postsecondary education is highly dynamic, more diverse than it appears and more effective than it is generally given credit for in serving the changing needs of students, employers and communities. And while traditional colleges and universities have tended to distance themselves from the for-profit sector, more and more of them are in fact embracing the same kinds of entrepreneurial, customer-focused approaches that have proven so successful on the for-profit side of the market. (Kathleen F. Kelly, Education Commission of the States, July 2001)...

The Rise of For-Profit Degree-Granting Institutions: Policy Considerations for States MS Word - With support from a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Education Commission of the States (ECS) conducted a three-year, multifaceted study of for-profit degree-granting institutions, which included development of an inventory of for-profit institutions, analyses of accreditation and state regulation, and a review of the research literature on the for-profit sector. The project also examined these institutions from the viewpoint of executives and managers, faculty, staff and students, based on more than 400 pages of interview transcripts and field notes. This second ECS policy brief reviews issues and challenges posed by the rapid growth of the for-profit sector of postsecondary education. (Kathleen F. Kelly, Education Commission of the States, August 2001)...

Higher Education: Are For-Profit Institutions Treated Differently? MS Word - From the point of view of an adult student who wants to go to college, there is no difference between an accounting degree received from a for-profit or proprietary institution and the same degree gained at a public or private nonprofit institution. This article is taken from the Fall 2000 ECS State Education Leader....

Report from the Regions: Accreditors’ Perceptions of the Role and Impact of For-Profit Institutions in Higher Education MS Word - This report explores the current role of regional accreditation in the for-profit sector. Interviews were conducted with seven regional accrediting associations to gather information regarding their views of and approaches to the role and impact of increasing numbers of for-profit institutions in higher education. Two for-profit institutions also were interviewed to gain an understanding of their view of regional accreditation for proprietary institutions. (National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, Education Commission of the States, January 2000)...

Literature Review: For-Profit Degree-Granting Institutions Within Higher Education MS Word - For-profit institutions are expanding rapidly and forcing changes within higher education. For-profit institutions are offering degrees in subjects that were previously considered the preserve of traditional universities and colleges. ECS has analyzed how rapidly the for-profit sector is growing; what forces support this growth; how effective the institutions have been in penetrating the higher education field; and how effective the for-profits have been in meeting the growing demand for higher education services. (Tunde Brimah, Education Commission of the States, November 1999)...

Roster of For-Profit Educational Institutions MS Word - This matrix of 662 for-profit institutions in higher education identifies profit information, accreditation, number of enrollment, tuition and other information of each for-profit institution. (Tunde Brimah, Education Commission of the States, December 1999)...

Just How Similar? Community Colleges and the For-Profit Sector - This brief illustrates that, while they may offer some of the same educational programs, their missions vary significantly and they serve different populations, resulting in different outcomes. Community colleges work to respond to educational, workforce and community needs. For-profit institutions are often looking toward the bottom line, with accountability to shareholders instead of students. This brief's findings show that apples-to-apples comparisons between the public and for- profit postsecondary institutions are not only limiting, but also can lead to distortions of performance. (Christopher Mullin, American Association of Community Colleges, November 2010)...

Guidelines for Quality Provision in Cross-border Higher Education - The increased cross-border mobility of students, academic staff, professionals, programs and providers presents challenges for existing national quality assurance and accreditation frameworks and bodies as well as for the systems recognizing foreign qualifications. The guidelines in this report are intended to provide an international framework for quality provision in cross-border higher education that responds to these challenges. (Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, 2005)...

Notes on For-Profit Higher Education in the United States - In the United States there are about 16 million students enrolled in postsecondary education, 25% of whom are enrolled in private institutions, of which, 86% are not-for-profit. This paper examines the 14% of private institutions that are for-profit, specifically profiling the nation’s largest for-profit institution, the University of Phoenix (UOP), which currently enrolls 200,000 students. The paper discusses the educational market niche that UOP fills, its sources of revenue, course offerings, faculty make-up, marketing practices and concerns about the effects that for-profit institutions may have on traditional not-for-profit institutions. (H.M. Levin, Peking University Education Review, November 2004)...

Profiles of For-Profit Education Management Companies, Fifth Annual Report, 2002-2003 - This directory of for-profit education management companies identifies 47 companies managing 417 schools in 24 states and the District of Columbia. An increase in the number of charter schools has led to growth in the number of these management companies. Arizona and Michigan, having what are considered the most permissive charter school laws, have 48% of all schools managed by for-profit companies. (Alex Molnar, Glen Wilson and Daniel Allen, Education Policy Studies Laboratory, Arizona State University, January 2003)...

For-Profit Higher Education and Community Colleges - This report presents findings from a two-year project co-directed by the Community College Research Center, Stanford Institute for Higher Education Research and the National Center for Postsecondary Improvement. The purpose of the project was to develop a better understanding of how for-profits compare to public community colleges, with respect to their students and programs, and to evaluate the extent to which the for-profit colleges compete directly with community colleges. Overall, the study identified two significant trends: (1) the quality of for-profit higher education has improved over the last decade, and (2) some of the differences between for-profits and public community colleges have faded. (Thomas Bailey, Norena Badway and Patricia Gumport, National Center for Postsecondary Improvement, 2001)...

"For-Profit Higher Education: Godzilla or Chicken Little?" - This article sets out to answer some tough questions such as, who will be the likely clientele of the newly accredited for-profit schools? These schools, which are characterized by lower costs and differentiated products, offer real competition to traditional private colleges and will force them to clarify their missions and specify exactly what kind of education they are offering. The result will be lower costs and the elimination of inefficient schools. This article is not available online. Contact Heldref Publications, 1319 Eighteenth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036-1802, phone 202-296-6267 (Gordon C. Winston, Change Magazine, January/February 1999)...

“For-Profit Application of the Corporate Model to Academic Enterprise” - This article reexamines some of the myths and realities of the for-profit sector of higher education from the perspective of DeVry Institutes. It also examines the advantages of for-profit institutions, including market sensitivity, a high level of accountability and no tenure. Because faculties at DeVry are deployed to teach, research is optional. This publication is not available online. (Richard Ruch, AAHE Bulletin, American Association for Higher Education, 202-293-6440, February 1999)...


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