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International Education MS Word - How are schools preparing American students to understand the international events unfolding around them? Do students understand and appreciate persons from diverse cultures around the world? Since September 11, 2001, these questions have taken on increased significance, and in the interest of sound education policy, state leaders are responding by taking another look at the strength of international education components in schools. (Jennifer Dounay, Education Commission of the States, September 2002)...

Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education -- Lessons from PISA for the United States - Latest OECD publication reviews PISA results for the strongest national performers in successfully reforming education and points out the lessons for the United States. (OECD, 2011) ...

Overcoming Inequality: Why Governance Matters, EFA Global Monitoring Report - This report offers a warning to governments, donors and the international community. On current trends universal primary education will not be achieved by 2015. Too many children are receiving an education of such poor quality that they leave school without basic literacy and numeracy skills. Deep and persistent disparities based on wealth, gender, location, ethnicity and other markers for disadvantage are acting as a major barrier to progress in education. If the world’s governments are serious about “education for all” they must get more serious about tackling inequity. The report presents some of the public policy and governance reforms that can break the cycle of disadvantage, improve access, raise quality, and enhance participation and accountability. Tracking progress annually toward the EFA goals, the report offers a comprehensive overview of the state of education in the world today. (UNESCO, January 2009)...

Education for Global Leadership: The Importance of International Studies and Foreign Language Education for U.S. Economic and National Security - This report argues that the increasing diversity of our workplaces, schools and communities is changing the face of our society, and that in order to confront the 21st-century challenges to our economy and national security, the U.S. education system must be strengthened to increase the foreign language skills and cultural awareness of our students. The report recommends: (1) that international content be taught across the curriculum and at all levels of learning, to expand American students’ knowledge of other countries and cultures; (2) that the training pipeline should be expanded at every level of education to address the paucity of Americans fluent in foreign languages, especially critical, less commonly taught languages; and (3) that national leaders – political leaders, as well as the business and philanthropic communities and the media – inform the public about the importance of improving education in foreign languages and international studies. (Committee for Economic Development, 2006) ...

Putting the World into Our Classrooms: A New Vision for 21st Century Education - U.S. public schools are doing a woeful job of teaching students about the world outside America's borders, a matter of increasing importance in an increasingly global economy. This paper argues that K-12 language instruction does not reflect current realities and that teachers in the United States are not prepared to teach about the world. The author recommends four steps that policymakers can take to ensure U.S. high school graduates will have the international knowledge and skills they will need in the 21st century: (1) Teach critical foreign languages to 100,000 Americans; (2) Train 25,000 teachers in international subjects; (3) Create internationally themed high schools; and (4) Modernize public media and technology funding to promote distance learning. (Michael H. Levine, Progressive Policy Institute, April 2005)...

Who Is Paying the Bills? The Federal Budget and Foreign Language Education in U.S. Schools and Universities - The author identifies and provides information about all the federal programs at least partially supporting foreign language instruction for nongovernment students. The author also calculates the maximum amount these programs spent on foreign language education in 2003, determining that for each $100 spent by the U.S. Department of Education, 15 cents was spent on foreign language instruction. (Catharine Keatley, National Capital Language Resource Center, March 2004)...

2003 States Institute on International Education in the School Meeting Report - This report briefly summarizes the proceedings of the three-day conference of the second States Institute on International Education in the Schools. It forcefully spells out the reasons why international education is needed in today's K-12 schools, and what states are doing and need to do to address these challenges. (Asia Society, November 2003)...

Securing America’s Future: Global Education for a Global Age - College students need to study abroad at least one semester during their postsecondary experience, affirm the members of the Strategic Task Force on Education Abroad in this report. Defining the contemporary ignorance about international affairs among most Americans a “Sputnik moment,” the task force sets forth the arguments for study abroad and the obstacles to be addressed -- faculty disconnects, curricular barriers, financial disincentives and the unique needs of nontraditional students. The authors additionally provide recommendations for the President and Congress; governors and state legislatures; college and university presidents; accreditation, licensing and certifying bodies; and the private sector. One recommendation for state leaders is to augment financial support for students who study abroad, potentially in collaboration with leading state industries. (Strategic Task Force on Education Abroad, NAFSA: Association of International Educators, November 2003)...

Mapping Internationalization on U.S. Campuses: Final Report (Executive Summary) - This report examines the extent to which campuses nationwide are internationalizing undergraduate programs, the policies facilitating internationalization and more. The authors identify strengths and weaknesses, and recommend practices to increase internationalization at U.S. postsecondary institutions. The full report can be purchased online. (Laura Siaya and Fred M. Hayward, American Council on Education, 2003)...

No Geographer Left Behind: A Policy Guide to Geography Education and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 - This paper traces the history of geography education in the U.S. from the 1980s to the present, and addresses the programs within the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) that can support geography, defined as a “core academic subject’ in the Act. Recommendations also are provided on how local, state and national leaders can make the most of the opportunities available in geography education, including creating an information campaign to familiarize geography teachers, school administrators and the Geography Alliance Network with NCLB and the opportunities it offers, improving the quality of geography teaching through development programs, and ensuring the continuation of such student assessments in geography as NAEP. (Ryan Daley, Geography Education National Implementation Project, May 2003)...

Beyond September 11: A Comprehensive National Policy on International Education - Producing more international experts, developing knowledge to address national strategic needs, and developing a globally competent citizenry and workforce are some major tenets of a federal strategy on international education proposed in this report. The report outlines the U.S. need for international and foreign-language expertise and citizen awareness, examines the shortages in those areas and proposes strategies and government policies to meet these needs. (American Council on Education, Center for Institutional and International Initiatives, 2002)...

National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP): Foreign Language - The inaugural NAEP Foreign Language assessment is being developed and is designed to assess twelfth-grade students who have learned Spanish in a variety of ways and for different lengths of time, at the national level only. A pilot test was conducted in the fall of 2003. On March 5, 2009, the National Assessment Governing Board postponed the planned 2012 administration, and made plans to include this subject in the assessment cycle beginning in 2018.(National Center for Education Statistics)...

Foreign Language Teaching: What the United States Can Learn from Other Countries - The researchers surveyed educators in 19 geographically and demographically diverse nations about the most successful aspects of foreign language instruction in their country, “model” programs in their countries, national policies for language education and more. The resulting report provides a wealth of information, including these nations’ curriculum frameworks, teacher education, use of technology, teaching strategies, assessments and policies that support foreign language instruction. The report sets out nine lessons the United States can learn from this, such as starting language education early, learning from other nations’ experiences and improving teacher education. Table 1 (page 8) indicates the first foreign language generally studied in these countries, the age at which such instruction starts, whether studying one (or more) languages is compulsory and the other foreign languages most commonly studied. (Ingrid Pufahl, Nancy C. Rhodes and Donna Christian, Center for Applied Linguistics, December 2000)...


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