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Improving Hispanic Achievement: Implications for State Policy PDF - On October 19, 2010 President Obama signed an Executive Order creating a presidential advisory commission on Hispanic education. Many ECS constituents are deeply committed to improving educational outcomes for Hispanics. This ECS Alert contains a sampling of ECS policy tracking, analysis and research syntheses aimed at helping state policymakers work towards this important goal....

Service-Learning and Hispanic Students: What Works in the Field PDF - This report examines best practices in educating Hispanic students and improving student graduation rates and matriculation into higher education. The author sought to determine whether successful schools implemented different practices for Hispanic students and how successful service-learning was as a pedagogical approach. (Tiffani Lennon, Education Commission of the States, July 2009)...

A Growing Population: Hispanic Students in U.S. Schools and the Implications for American Education PDF - This issue of The Progress of Education Reform looks at three recent research studies on academic success for Hispanic students and offers insights on strategies that show promise in promoting greater educational attainment for Hispanic students. (Jennifer Piscatelli, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 9, no. 6, Education Commission of the States, November 2008)...

Math Scores Add Up for Hispanic Students: States and School Districts Notable for Recent Gains by Hispanic Students in Mathematics - Between 2003 and 2013, 4th and 8th grade Hispanic students' math scores improved significantly, as measured by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Two out of three states saw improvement. Best states were New Jersey, Indiana, Hawaii, Arizona and the Department of Defense Education Administration. Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Texas got honorable mentions while best big-city school districts were Charlotte, Boston and Houston. (Natalia Pane, Child Trends Hispanic Institute, November 2014)....

America's Hispanic Children: Gaining Ground, Looking Forward - One in four American children is Latino and that percentage is growing. While there are troubling trends in Latino child demographics, there are also strengths upon which to build. With the idea that as more is known, the better investments in their well-being will be, Child Trends recently launched the Hispanic Institute. This report points out that while many Latino children live in poverty, they enter school on a par with or even exceeding their non-Latino peers in social-emotional skills; most live with two parents; and - from early childhood to college - they are making gains in education. (David Murphey, Lina Guzman and Alicia Torres, Child Trends, September 2014)...

White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics - By working directly with shareholders,key individuals and organizations, the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics advances three goals: to improve access to early learning for Hispanic children, to increase the number of Hispanic high school graduates and to ensure more Hispanics complete college. The initiative also coordinates the Federal Interagency Working Group on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. (White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics, February 2014)...

Mapping the Latino Population, By State, County and City - The U.S. Latino population is dispersing and Pew is keeping track of that dispersal. U.S. Hispanic populations are ranked by state, the 60 largest metropolitan areas, and more than 3,000 counties. Eight states have a Latino population more than a million: California, Texas, Florida, New York, Illinois, Arizona, New Jersey, and Colorado. Alabama's Hispanic population grew 158% between 2000 and 2011, more than any other state. (Anna Brown and Mark Hugo Lopez, Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project, August 2013) ...

Hispanic High School Graduates Pass Whites in Rate of College Enrollment - For the first time, Latino high school graduates passed whites in college enrollment rate. In the fall class of 2012, 69% of Latino high school graduates enrolled in college compared to 67% of their white counterparts. The achievement gap hasn't closed, however. Latinos are still less likely to enroll in a four-year institution, more likely to be part-time students, and less likely to complete a bachelor's degree than whites. The original data source is the October school enrollment supplement of the Current Population Survey collected by the Census Bureau. (Richard Fry and Paul Taylor, Pew Hispanic Center, May 2013)...

Now Largest Minority Group on Four-Year College Campuses: Hispanic Student Enrollments Reach New Highs in 2011 - This report provides data on enrollment figures by race and ethnicity as well as information on the number of post-secondary degrees conferred on students of all ages. The report shows that, as their growth among all college-age students continues to outpace other groups, Hispanics are now, for the first time, the largest minority group among the nation’s four-year college and university students. (Pew Research Center-Pew Hispanic Center, August 2012)...

When Labels Don't Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity - This report explores Latinos’ attitudes about their identity; their language usage patterns; their core values; and their views about the U.S. and their families’ country of origin. It is based on findings from a national bilingual survey of 1,220 Hispanic adults. (Pew Research Center-Pew Hispanic Center, April 2012)...

Responding to the Needs of Young Latino Children: State Efforts to Build Comprehensive Early Learning Systems - The National Council of La Raza conducted interviews with early childhood leaders in eight states with significant Latino populations to gauge how responsive early learning systems are to the needs of children in these communities. Among other shortcomings, they found states lacking in articulating early learning standards that reflect English Language Learners’ developmental trajectory, implementing bilingual education programs, providing teachers with adequate training and professional development. The report ends with recommendations for federal policy makers and state early learning councils to address these challenges. (Erika Beltran, National Council of La Raza, February 2010)...

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap - The Pew survey funds there actually are two different gaps in the educational aspirations of the young. One is between Hispanic youth and the general U.S. population. The other is even bigger and it largely explains the first gap. That is between young Latinos who are immigrants and those who are native born. (Mark Hugo Lopez, Pew Hispanic Center, October 2009)...

New Leaders, New Directions: Tools for Advancing an Early Childhood Agenda for the Latino Community - This toolkit from the National Council of La Raza provides advocacy tools and tips for promoting more and better early education programs for Latino children. The resource includes advice on message framing, identifying potential partners, coalition building, action planning and media strategies. (Erika Beltran and Sarah Dolan, National Council of LaRaza, July 2009)...

Hispanicity and Educational Inequality: Risk, Opportunities and the Nation's Future - Lecture addresses the significance of the growing Hispanic population on education. Tienda discusses the barriers beneath Hispanics' representation in higher education, and identifies future challenges for the nation as the baby boom generation retires from the labor force. She concludes that closing the Hispanic-White educational achievement gap is not only an attainable goal but an opportunity to thwart future ethnic economic and social inequality. (Martia Tienda, Educational Testing Service, March 2009)...

Latino Legislative Hearing on Pre-K & the Early Grades - Expert testimonies on “Pre-K and the Early Grades” from a hearing organized by the National Association of Latino Elected Officials (NALEO) are compiled in this report, providing a rich knowledge base to inform both practice and advocacy. Topics include: dual-language models that promote bilingualism, program alignment from pre-k through third grade, and early education funding strategies. The report offers recommendations related to teacher quality and professional development, curriculum, parent involvement, funding and program quality. (NALEO Education Leadership Initiative, September 2008)...

Revisiting and Updating the Multicultural Principles for Head Start Programs Serving Children Ages Birth to Five - This Office of Head Start document updates their 10 multicultural principles and provides resources, including research summaries and best practices, to help programs translate these concepts into action. (Early Head Start National Resource Center, 2008)...

Pre-K and Latinos: The Foundation for America's Future - The size of the Hispanic population is rising rapidly in the United States, and Hispanic children are more likely than whites to start school without the foundational math and reading knowledge and skills necessary for academic success. This report argues that ensuring access to high-quality pre-kindergarten for Hispanic children – who currently have less access than white or African American children – will help to close the achievement gap and is an important step toward improving K-12 education. Recommendations include: (1) pre-k programs should engage all families in meaningful ways in the school and classroom regardless of the language they speak; (2) states should adopt at least one bilingual or Spanish language pre-k curriculum; and (3) states should establish appropriate measures to assess how well programs are providing services to all children, with a particular focus on first-language development and second-language acquisition. (Eugene E. Garcia and Danielle M. Gonzales, Pre[k]now, July 2006) ...


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