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At-Risk (incl. Dropout Prevention)
English Language Learner/Bilingual
High School--Dropout Rates/Graduation Rates
Minority/Diversity Issues
Postsecondary Students--Minority
Student Achievement
Student Achievement--Closing the Achievement Gap


Progress of Education Reform: Hispanic Achievement PDF - This issue of The Progress of Education Reform summarizes several recent studies and analyses that shed new light on the dimensions, causes, and social and economic consequences of Hispanic underachievement. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 5, no. 3, Education Commission of the States, August 2004)...

Early Educational Opportunities for Children of Hispanic Origins - This brief reviews the literature on effective early education programs for young Latino children -- the largest and fastest growing racial minority group in the U.S – concluding that dual-language programs are more effective than monolingual programs. Policy recommendations are offered for the federal, state, and local levels, aimed at better serving Latino children. (Eugene Garcia and Bryant Jensen, Society for Research in Child Development, 2009)...

Preschool Enrollment Among Latino Children in California - This brief examines barriers to enrollment to pre-k among Latino families in California. (Wealth Research Organization, 2009)...

Latino Children: A Majority Are U.S.-Born Offspring of Immigrants - The family context of Hispanic children is changing. In future years a greater share will be born into families that have been in the United States for at least a generation and whose parents will have been both born and educated in the U.S. This compositional change will likely affect the education and social outcomes of Hispanic children. (Richard Fry and Jeffrey Passel, Pew Hispanic Center, May 2009)...

The Changing Landscape of American Public Education: New Students, New Schools - This report examines the intersection of two trends that have transformed the landscape of American public education in recent years: a rapid increase in enrollment and a surge in the opening of new schools. The report describes the racial and ethnic components of enrollment growth at various levels of the K-12 system. It also examines the composition of enrollment in newly-opened schools and older schools still in operation as well as the impact of rapid growth in Hispanic enrollment. Detailed statistics at the state level are also provided. (Richard Fry, The Pew Hispanic Center, October 2006) ...

School and Parent Interaction by Household Language and Poverty Status: 2002-03 - This issue brief describes school-to-home communication practices and opportunities for parent involvement at school as reported by parents of U.S. school-age students from primarily English- and primarily Spanish-speaking households during the 2002–03 school year. Among the findings: A greater percentage of students in English-speaking households than in Spanish-speaking households had parents who reported receiving personal notes or e-mails about the student; receiving newsletters, memos or notices addressed to all parents; opportunities to attend general meetings; opportunities to attend school events; and chances to volunteer. Differences were still apparent after taking poverty status into account. (Christine Enyeart, Juliet Diehl, Gillian Hampden-Thompson and Marion Scotchmer, National Center for Education Statistics, September 2006) ...

Pre-K and Latinos: The Foundation for America’s Future - This report shows that, by providing Latino children with culturally and linguistically appropriate services in high-quality, pre-k-for-all programs, educators and policymakers can help close the achievement gap and make a major contribution to realizing this growing population's remarkable potential. (Eugene Garcia and Danielle Gonzales, Pre-K No, July 2006)...

Latino Achievement in the Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics - This brief addresses Latino population growth in the United States and their participation in higher education, particularly in science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs. (Educational Testing Service, 2006) ...

Reaching Higher Ground - This study identifies 10 successful parental outreach programs based at postsecondary institutions that target Latino parents and provide curriculum services specifically for them. Listed programs include multiyear efforts involving parents and children, short-term events geared exclusively to parents and one-day events designed to reach hundreds of participants. Despite the different approaches of each program, all share five characteristics: (1) committed program champions, (2) cultural considerations, (3) program evaluation, (4) successful partnerships and (5) stable funding sources. (Celina Torres and Amalia Marquez, The Tomas Rivera Policy Institute, May 2005)...

Latino High School Students and Baccalaureate Graduates - The second in a three-part series of the Latino Students and the Educational Pipeline study, this report examines the primary differences between Latino and white students who have completed a bachelor’s degree and other levels of education. The report details background characteristics, preparation for postsecondary education and employment outcomes. Findings include: (1) 43% of Hispanic bachelor's completers had parents with a bachelor's degree or higher, compared to 56% of white students; (2) Hispanic bachelor's completers earned on average a 3.1 gradepoint average in high school, compared to 3.2 for white students; and (3) Hispanic bachelor's degree completers earned an average of $24,810 a year, compared to $28,938 for white students. (Watson Scott Swail, Alberto F. Cabrera, Chul Lee and Adriane Williams, Educational Policy Institute, April 2005)...

Pathways to the Bachelor’s Degree for Latino Students - Part III of the study Latino Students and The Educational Pipeline, which uses National Educational Longitudinal Study data to compare Latino and white students, focuses on students who attained a bachelor’s degree and what it took to get there. By taking into consideration student and family characteristics, postsecondary aspirations and planning behaviors, secondary school activities, postsecondary activities and financial support factors, the bachelor’s degree persistence gap can be dramatically reduced by taking action in specific areas. Latino students who are supported by their families in the pursuit of postsecondary education, create a plan by the 8th grade, take three years of mathematics or more, start at a four-year institution, maintain continuous enrollment and a gradepoint average of 2.50 or above can close the gap. (Watson Scott Swail, Alberto F. Cabrera, Chul Lee and Adriane Williams, Educational Policy Institute, April 2005)...

Challenges in Improving Latino College Enrollment: Opportunities for Systemic Change (Viewpoints from California) - The Tomás Rivera Policy Institute's 2004 fall conference was convened to discuss how to improve Latino enrollment on a systemic level in California. This paper provides readers with summaries of six presentations from the conference: (1) The Present and Coming Crisis: Demography and Education; (2) A View from the Academic Community; (3) A View from the Trenches; (4) Keynote Presentation: The Invisible People; (5) Applications of Real-World Solutions; and (6) Financing College: The Unspoken Obstacle. (The Tomás Rivera Policy Institute, March 2005)...

From Middle School to the Workforce: Latino Students in the Educational Pipeline - The study on Latino Students and The Educational Pipeline is a three-part series. This report, which is Part I, examines how National Educational Longitudinal Study Latino students compared to white students over a 12-year period, examining background characteristics, preparation for postsecondary education, access to postsecondary education, postsecondary persistence and completion and employment outcomes. Latino students were less likely to have a parent with an earned educational credential and more likely to be from a low-income background. Additionally, Latino students were more likely to take certain remedial classes and less likely to take rigorous coursework in high school. Almost two-thirds of Latino students who enrolled in postsecondary education did not earn a degree by the year 2000, compared to 40% of white students. (Watson Scott Swail, Alberto F. Cabrera, Chul Lee and Adriane Williams, Educational Policy Institute, April 2005)...

How Latino Students Pay for College PDF - Although the percentage of Latino students receiving financial aid for college is at an all-time high, Latinos receive the lowest average federal aid awards of any racial or ethnic group, receiving an average financial aid award of $6,250, compared to the national average of $6,890 in 2003-04. This brief argues that Latinos rely heavily on federal aid – and on grants in particular – because they are more likely to be first-generation college students and to have relatively low family incomes. The brief offers a profile of Latino undergraduates along with an overview of Latino undergraduates participating in financial aid, and has sections on: (1) grants; (2) loans; (3) federal financial aid; (4) state financial aid; and (5) institutional aid. Policy recommendations at the federal, state/local, institutional and K-12 community levels are listed, starting on page 23. (Excelencia in Education and the Institute for Higher Education Policy, August 2005)...

The New Latino South and the Challenge to Public Education: Strategies for Educators and Policymakers in Emerging Immigrant Communities - The author provides a nationwide overview of Hispanic population growth in the U.S. since 1990, and background on the three case study sites, one each in North Carolina, Georgia and Arkansas — communities with some of the greatest growth in the Hispanic population from 1990-2000. Chapter Three presents a picture of Latino education in the South, nationwide and in the case study sites. The author then addresses four areas — parental involvement, teacher training, immigration status and discrimination — identified in the case study sites as major obstacles to immigrant education, as well as innovative strategies being used in the case study schools to overcome these obstacles. Policy recommendations are included in Chapter Eight. (Andrew Wainer, Tomás Rivera Policy Institute, November 2004)...

Status and Trends in the Education of Hispanics - The report includes sections on demographics (starting on page 5), preprimary, elementary and secondary education (page 21), postsecondary education (page 93) and outcomes of education (page 113). A section comparing academic achievement of Hispanic students to students of other racial or ethnic groups begins on page 45. Page 85 contains a chart illustrating the percent of students of different racial ethnic groups who report having a computer in their household. (National Center for Education Statistics, April 2003)...

With Diploma in Hand: Hispanic High School Seniors Talk About Their Future - This report is the fruit of focus groups in multiple states conducted to better comprehend the void between Hispanic parents’ high educational hopes for their children and Hispanic students’ marginal educational attainment. The report identifies the tremendous diversity of Hispanics in terms of economic status and national and cultural backgrounds, which is reflected in the decisions young people make about their post-high school plans. The unique obstacles Hispanic students face are likewise enumerated, including (1) insufficient adult support; (2) conflicting signals from teachers; (3) misinformation; (4) other seemingly attractive alternatives, such as paid employment immediately after high school graduation; (5) perception that college is for specialized training; (6) poor choices; and (7) limited grasp of planning and organization, and a lower sense of efficacy. A supplementary Web site allows you to browse the report by chapter as well as the commentary by advisory group members. (John Immerwahr, National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, and Public Agenda, June 2003)...

2004 National Survey of Latinos: Politics and Civic Participation - The findings of this survey show that education is a greater concern for Latino voters than for the general population, and that survey respondents placed the issue above any other in their consideration of the 2004 presidential candidates. They also indicate that Latino registered voters have higher levels of education than Latinos in general, and are more likely to have been born in the United States. The chartpack/summary of findings will be of particular interest. (Pew Hispanic Center, Kaiser Family Foundation, July 2004)...

Latino Student Success at Hispanic-Serving Institutions - Latino students are one of the fastest growing groups enrolling in postsecondary education today and nearly half of them are enrolled at Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs). This policy brief summarizes what is known about Latino student achievement and suggests further areas of research. Six HSIs participated in a 12-month research study that compared institutional practices with student outcomes. Promising practices include: using disaggregated student data to identify areas of need, partnering with K-12 and community colleges to increase Latino participation, and encouraging strong leadership that is committed to the success of Latino students. (Deborah A. Santiago, Sally J. Andrade and Sarita E. Brown, January 2004)...

Pathways to a Four-Year Degree: Determinants of transfer and degree completion among socioeconomically disadvantaged students - A bachelor’s degree is a gatekeeper to a myriad of social and individual benefits, including increased income and employment stability. This report identifies nine paths to a four-year degree, noting which paths are most likely to lead a student to a bachelor’s degree. Those securing high academic resources and enrolling at a four-year university as their first institution were most likely to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. Students with low socio-economic backgrounds tended to follow the paths least likely to lead a bachelor’s degree. A related article by Alberto F. Cabrera, Designing Pathways to a Four-Year Degree, also is available online. (Alberto F. Cabrera, Kurt R. Burkum and Steven M. La Nasa, University of Wisconsin, 2004)...

Closing Achievement Gaps: Improving Educational Outcomes for Hispanic Children - The goals of this report are to familiarize Hispanic state legislators and other stakeholders with a range of educational issues confronting the community, as well as to pose potential program and policy solutions. A major premise of the report is these issues will be addressed and solved through visionary changes in public education. (Louis G. Tornatzky, Harry P. Pachon and Celina Torres, National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators, April 2003)...

The Rise of the Second Generation: Changing Patterns in Hispanic Population Growth - Growing rapidly since 1970, first-generation Hispanics — those born outside the United States — comprised 40% of the overall Hispanic population in 2000. The authors predict that this share will fall, as second-generation Hispanics — those born in the United States with at least one foreign-born parent — become the largest share of the U.S. Hispanic population by 2020. This demographic shift will present the U.S. education system with new challenges, as schools are faced with educating native-born students being raised by immigrant parents. (Roberto Suro and Jeffrey S. Passel, Pew Hispanic Center, October 2003)...

From Risk to Opportunity: Fulfilling the Educational Needs of Hispanic Americans in the 21st Century - Setting forth the "present crisis in the education of Hispanic children and youth," this report proposes numerous strategies for addressing this crisis, grouped under six umbrella recommendations targeted at various levels ranging from Hispanic families, to teacher preparation and recruitment systems, to federal programs. (The President's Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans, March 31, 2003)...

Religion Matters: Predicting Schooling Success Among Latino Youth - Drawing on data from three nationwide surveys conducted in the late 1990s, this report examines the role religion plays in Latino youth's educational experiences. The authors note a positive relationship between academic success and religious faith or practice among Latinos.(David Sikkink and Edwin I. Hernandez, Center for the Study of Latino Religion, January 2003) ...

Educating Latinos: An NPR Special Report - Latino students now make up the largest minority group in the school-age population in the country. Yet they lag behind their white and Asian peers – and in some cases African Americans – on most measures of achievement: test scores, college completion, dropout rates. National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" features a five-part series on the challenges facing Latino students. Series topics include bilingual education and meeting the needs of Latino girls....

The Improving Educational Profile of Latino Immigrants - The percentage of adults with a high school education has grown faster among foreign-born Latinos than among natives since 1970, according to this report from the Pew Hispanic Center. The report suggests the education gap between immigrants and native-born Americans will narrow in the future and finds that the number or foreign-born Latinos who receive their education here in the United States is growing. (B. Lindsay Lowell and Robert Suro, Pew Hispanic Center, December 2002)...

Falling Behind or Moving Up? The Intergenerational Progress of Mexican Americans - People of Mexican descent in the United States earn substantially less than other workers because they receive less schooling than almost all other racial and ethnic groups, according to a report by the Public Policy Institute of California. The report finds that third-generation Mexican Americans on average earn about 25% less, and receive a year-and-a-half less schooling, than non-Hispanic whites. (Jeffrey Grogger and Stephen J. Trejo, Public Policy Institute of California, 2002)...

A Compromised Commitment - Almost 25% of the Hispanic population is located in the five southwestern states of Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. Current education policies are not addressing the needs of the Hispanic population, as evidenced by a significant achievement gap and a high dropout rate. This report provides a regional profile of the Southwest, as well as profiles of the five states, which include demographic data, policy recommendations and other relevant information for each state. The authors argue that more effectively educating Hispanics will be crucial for the future prosperity of the entire United States, advocating for the creation of a “Latino Marshall Plan” to address the issue at the national level instead of the regional or state level. (Baltazar A. Acevedo Jr., Lee Roy Ortiz, Leonard Baca, Roberto Haro and Leonard A. Valverde, Hispanic Border Leadership Institute, March 2002)...

Si, Se Puede! Yes, We Can: Latinas in School MS Word - This new report explores the social, cultural and community factors that affect the education achievement of Latinas, who lag behind other racial and ethnic groups of girls in several key measures, including graduation rates and postsecondary enrollment. (American Association of University Women, 2000)...

Transforming Education for Hispanic Youth: Broad Recommendations for Policy and Practice - This issue brief examines the high dropout rate among Hispanics, recommending that in order to better address the issue, school staff and education policymakers should depoliticize education for Hispanic youth, appropriately fund public schools, streamline and make intelligible policies that parents and students must follow, discontinue policies that tacitly permit or encourage Hispanic students to drop out, develop standards for school conditions and design comprehensive dropout prevention strategies. This issue brief also includes a self-evaluation tool designed to help school staff and policymakers evaluate their efforts to educate Hispanic youth. (Anne Turnbaugh Lockwood, National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, January 2000)...


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