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Parent/FamilySelected Research & Readings (Additional Resources)
 
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Selected Research & Readings
 




Parents’ Reports of the School Readiness of Young Children from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2007: First Look - Data on the school readiness of U.S. children as reported by their parents are presented, along with basic demographic information about the children—their parent/guardians and household characteristics. For example, about 58% of children ages 3 to 6 and not yet in kindergarten are in preschools or daycare centers, 7% of parents planned to delay entry into kindergarten (9% of boys versus 4% of girls), 55% of children were read to every day and children who watched television averaged 2.6 hours on a typical weekday. (Kevin O'Donnell and Gail Mulligan, U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, August 2008)...

The Family: America's Smallest School - This report outlines the family and home conditions affecting children's cognitive development and school achievement, and how gaps beginning early persist throughout life. Critical factors examined include child care quality, parental involvement in schools, parent/pupil ratio, family finances, literacy development, student absences and physical home environments. (Educational Testing Service, September 2007) ...

Fixing the Milwaukee Public Schools: The Limits of Parent-Driven Reform - The Milwaukee Public Schools district continues to suffer from poor student performance. Student test scores and dropout rates are at deplorable levels, both in absolute terms and in comparison with the rest of Wisconsin. In an attempt to improve these outcomes, the district itself has embraced two reforms in particular: public school choice and parental involvement. This report examines the limits of parent-driven reform. (David Dodenhoff, Wisconsin Policy Research Institute, 2007)...

School and Parent Interaction by Household Language and Poverty Status: 2002-03 - This issue brief describes school-to-home communication practices and opportunities for parent involvement at school as reported by parents of U.S. school-age students from primarily English- and primarily Spanish-speaking households during the 2002–03 school year. Among the findings: A greater percentage of students in English-speaking households than in Spanish-speaking households had parents who reported receiving personal notes or e-mails about the student; receiving newsletters, memos or notices addressed to all parents; opportunities to attend general meetings; opportunities to attend school events; and chances to volunteer. Differences were still apparent after taking poverty status into account. (Christine Enyeart, Juliet Diehl, Gillian Hampden-Thompson and Marion Scotchmer, National Center for Education Statistics, September 2006) ...

Are Parents and Students Ready for More Math and Science? - Many business, education and government leaders have recently been advocating for major education reform, particularly as it pertains to improving mathematics and science achievement in the nation's schools. This report examines results from a recent survey of the attitudes of parents and students in public schools, with accompanying charts examining results in the following areas: (1) just how much harder should high school be, (2) are the problems social or academic, (3) many parents are complacent about science and math education, (4) many students are lukewarm to math and science, (5) are high school girls less interested and (6) minority students see math and science as essential. (Jean Johnson, Ana Maria Arumi, Amber Ott and Michael Hamill, Public Agenda, January 2006)...

Parents' Reports of School Practices to Provide Information to Families: 1996 and 2003 - Studies suggest that parent involvement is related to factors such as children’s grades in school, test scores and grade retention. Given the importance of parent involvement, researchers, policymakers and practitioners have sought ways to promote it. In this report, data from the Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey of the 2003 National Household Education Surveys Program were used to replicate previous analyses using the Parent and Family Involvement in Education and Civic Involvement Survey of the 1996 National Household Education Surveys Program. As with the previous report, parent-reported school information practices are discussed first and then examined in relation to the frequency of parent involvement at the school. Results in both survey years show that the average number of parent-reported school information practices done “very well” differed by school, family, and student characteristics. (Nancy Vaden-Kiernan, National Center for Education Statistics, December 2005)...

Easing the Transition from PreK to Kindergarten: What Schools Can Do to Address Child Readiness - This paper examines how schools can successfully involve parents in preparing pre-kindergarten students for the transition to kindergarten, it includes a school snapshot in addition to sections on what to consider, putting it into practice and related research. (Chris Ferguson and Lacy Wood, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, October 2005)...

Reaching Out to Diverse Populations: What Can Schools Do to Foster Family-School Connections? - Parents are interested in their children's academic success regardless of ethnicity, culture or economic status, although they may not know how to help their children, feel incapable of assisting them or have a perspective on family involvement that differs from the school. This paper examines how schools can successfully overcome challenges that may inhibit parental involvement, it includes a school snapshot in addition to sections on what to consider, putting it into practice and related research. (Chris Ferguson, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, September 2005)...

Reaching Higher Ground - This study identifies 10 successful parental outreach programs based at postsecondary institutions that target Latino parents and provide curriculum services specifically for them. Listed programs include multiyear efforts involving parents and children, short-term events geared exclusively to parents and one-day events designed to reach hundreds of participants. Despite the different approaches of each program, all share five characteristics: (1) committed program champions, (2) cultural considerations, (3) program evaluation, (4) successful partnerships and (5) stable funding sources. (Celina Torres and Amalia Marquez, The Tomas Rivera Policy Institute, May 2005)...

Taking a Closer Look: A Guide to Online Resources on Family Involvement - There is more information on family involvement online than any one person can keep track of now, and the body of information is constantly growing. Intended to make accessing and using this large body of information easier, this resource guide contains annotated Web links to research, information and tools about family involvement published in or after 2000. In addition to an appendix, the guide is separated into seven sections: (1) knowledge development, (2) professional development, (3) standards, (4) programs, (5) tools, (6) convening and (7) special initiatives. Owing to the constant flow of new quality resources, this guide will be periodically updated. (Heather B. Weiss, Kelly Faughnan, Margaret Caspe, Cassandra Wolos, M. Elena Lopez and Holly Kreider, Harvard Family Research Project, September 2005)...

SES in Action: A Toolkit for Parents and Community Leaders - Although growing numbers of children from low-income families are getting free tutoring through the Supplemental Educational Services (SES) program – part of No Child Left Behind – large numbers of eligible students have not yet signed up. Early evidence suggests that families in many districts don't know about SES, are receiving confusing or limited information about their tutoring options, or need help choosing the best provider for their child. This guide is intended to help community leaders build excitement and understanding of SES, with sections on: (1) SES basics; (2) taking action; and (3) resources. (American Institutes for Research, July 2005)...

Changing the Nature of Parent Involvement MS Word PDF - Parental involvement in a child’s education takes many forms, and states have a variety of policies to encourage it. This "Stateline" article discusses the prevalence of parental involvement polices in the states, examining Maryland’s parent advisory council in particular, and summarizes other state activity. (Kathy Christie, Phi Delta Kappan, May 2005. Reprinted with permission)...

NCLB Action Briefs Parental Involvement - This paper examines Section 1118, Title I of the No Child Left Behind Act, the only section devoted solely to parental involvement. The section requires every school district and school receiving Title I funds to have a written parental involvement policy and must build school capacity to effectively implement the policy. The paper discusses the text of Section 1118, potential challenges, action opportunities for community and parent leaders, a parental involvement checklist and tips for developing a school family involvement policy. Also included are sections on keys to success, and a list of relevant resources on page 15. (Public Education Network and National Coalition for Parent Involvement in Education, April 2004)...

Parent and Family Involvement in Education: 2002-03 - This report examines parent and family involvement in education, presenting data from a survey of over 12,000 parents of children in kindergarten through 12th grade in the United States. Tables disaggregate data by a number of indicators, including school type, school schedule, household poverty status, parents' language, students' grade level, students' race/ethnicity and sex. (Nancy Vaden-Kiernan and Chris Chapman, National Center for Education Statistics, May 2005)...

The Evaluation Exchange: Evaluating Family Involvement Programs - This issue of the Harvard periodical contains articles designed to push those in the family involvement field to consider three questions: (1) How can research and evaluation be aligned with practice knowledge to gain a deeper understanding of the contextual variables that influence family involvement outcomes? (2) How can a continuous system of programs serving children and families from birth to adolescence be created? (3) What can research and evaluation tell us about where and when in children’s lives the most promising investments should be made? The issue is broken into eight sections, Theory & Practice, Promising Practices , Spotlight, Questions & Answers, Beyond Basic Training, Evaluations to Watch, Ask the Expert, and New & Noteworthy. (Harvard Graduate School of Education, December 2004)...

Building Strong Families 2004 - This study examines the opinions of Latino and African American parents in identifying challenges facing the formation of strong families. While both groups of parents perceived themselves as successful parents and believed that the single most effective way to become better parents was to spend more time with their children, they each identified external, societal factors as key challenges. These included job losses in the community, protecting children from negative influences and the cost of health care. Additionally, many Latino parents face the burden of not knowing English well. Both groups lack parenting support, with almost 60% reporting only one source of support beyond their spouse or partner. (Eugene C. Roehlkepartain, Marc Mannes, Peter C. Scales, Shenita Lewis and Brent Bolstrom, Abundant Assets Alliance, November 2004)...

No More Islands: Family Involvement in 27 School and Youth Programs - Arguing that school and youth programs should not treat participating children as "islands" but rather involve the participants' families to improve youth outcomes, the authors highlight the family involvement component of 27 programs. They report that family involvement takes various forms across the programs, and that, while it cannot be said that family involvement causes youth development, all of the programs that had this component indicated positive outcomes for participating youth. The authors likewise recommend ways that policymakers and school and youth program practitioners can strengthen youth program outcomes through family involvement. (Donna Walker James and Glenda Partee, American Youth Policy Forum, 2003)...

A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family and Community Connections on Student Achievement - According to this report by the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL), research shows that when parents are actively engaged in their children's education, students get higher grades and are more likely to go to college. The report also found that white, middle-class families tend to be more involved in schools and that supporting parental involvement in all families may be an important tool in closing student achievement gaps. (Anne T. Henderson, Karen L. Mapp, Catherine Jordan, Evangelina Orozco, Amy Averett, Deborah Donnelly, Joan Buttram, Lacy Wood, Marilyn Fowler and Margaret Myers, SEDL, 2002) ...

A Lot Easier Said Than Done: Parents Talk About Raising Children in Today’s America - A new study from Public Agenda explores parents’ views in raising their children today. The study found more than 80% of parents believe it is essential to teach their children to always do their very best in school. Only 50% of parents, however, believe they have been successful in this regard. Almost 50% of parents also worry they may need to push their child more when it comes to school work. (Steve Farkas, Jean Johnson, Ann Duffett, Leslie Wilson and Jackie Vine, Public Agenda, October 2002)...

Emerging Issues in School, Family and Community Connections - This research synthesis produced by the National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools identifies four issues crucial to helping schools, families and communities work together to improve the education system. One key issue is the need for more precise measures of the impact of various parent/community involvement programs. A general knowledge of the research is no longer enough for those who lead school, family and community connection initiatives to be credible and to lead successfully. (Catherine Jordan, Evangelina Orozco, Amy Averett, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, 2001)...

Efforts by Public K-8 Schools to Involve Parents in Children’s Education: Do Schools and Parents Agree? - This report answers two major questions: Do children's parents acknowledge the efforts that schools reportedly are making, and do schools report the same level of parent participation in school programs as parents do? This report studies the level of agreement between parents' and schools' views of how schools involve parents in their children's education and how parents respond to the opportunities for involvement that schools provide. The findings can assist policymakers, educators, researchers and school staff in their future efforts to evaluate parents' involvement in their children's education. (Xianglei Chen, Kathryn Chandler, U. S. Department of Education, Statistical Analysis Report 2001-076, September 2001)...


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