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The Progress of Education Reform

GE foundation

PER issues

These publications are made possible in part through a grant from the GE Foundation.

If you'd like to order a print copy of The Progress of Education Reform, contact the ECS Distribution Center at 303.299.3692 or jivey@ecs.org. Each issue costs $7.00 plus postage and handling.

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The Progress of Education Reform addresses the hottest education issues andprovides information in a concise and easy-to-read format based on the most recent studies and reports. Please use the expandable menus below to read summaries of and download any issue.

2014 (click to expand/collapse)
progress of education reform december 2013 The Progress of Education Reform: What State Policymakers Need to Know about Funding Virtual Charter Schools
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform outlines the key differences and explores how states can change their funding systems to address the needs of this new type of public education. (Michael Griffith, ECS, February 2014)
2013 (click to expand/collapse)
progress of education reform december 2013 The Progress of Education Reform: English Language Learners
The latest issue of the Progress of Education Reform explores the research and data underscoring the urgency of better serving the growing English language learner (ELL) population, and highlights research and approaches that may inform state responses. (Jennifer Dounay Zinth, ECS, December 2013)

Progress of Education The Progress of Education Reform: Math in the Early Years
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform reveals five surprising findings about the strong relationship between early math instruction and later student achievement. Researchers have found that early knowledge of math not only predicts later success in math, but also predicts later reading achievement even better than do early reading skills. The paper concludes with implications and recommendations for state policy that will support the development of early math competencies and young children. (Doug Clements and Julie Sarama, University of Denver, October 2013)
progress of education august 2013 The Progress of Education Reform: Who Pays the Tab for K-12 Education?
The purpose of careful selection of wealth measures in funding formulas is to ensure that state funding is directed toward those districts that cannot afford to fund public education. This issue of The Progress of Education Reform examines why measuring a district’s wealth by property values alone can be a problem. (Michael Griffith, ECS, August 2013)
progress of ed The Progress of Education Reform: Reimagining Business Involvement
Business thrives on the sure thing—the in-demand product, the new technology, the well-educated worker. Yet while new technologies and products have revolutionized the economy and our way of life, college graduates' workforce readiness has not kept pace. This issue of The Progress of Education Reform explores new models of business involvement that could substantially decrease private sector training costs and presents ways that policymakers can integrate these approaches into a coherent statewide engagement strategy (Matthew Smith, ECS, June 2013).
Progress of education reform april 2013 The Progress of Education Reform: The New Civics
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform provides a close look at the new civics—how it differs from previous practices, what it includes, how it is supported by research, and its implications for policy. (Paul Baumann and Molly Ryan, ECS, April 2013)
progress of ed The Progress of Education Reform: Career/Technical Education
This issue of the Progress of Education Reform identifies new approaches states are adopting to support career readiness for students. (Jennifer Dounay Zinth, ECS, February 2013)
2012 (click to expand/collapse)
progress of ed The Progress of Education Reform: Teacher Expectations of Students
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform provides a review of the research on the relationship between teacher expectations and student achievement. It also explores how policy can be used to improve how schools are evaluating for, monitoring, and providing training to teachers on the potential negative effects of fixed teacher expectations. (Emily Workman, ECS, Dec. 2012)
PER The Progress of Education Reform: Producing Quality Credentials
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform presents emerging research on the value of credentials and highlights ways that states can leverage data and accompanying strategies to strengthen the fit between the production of postsecondary credentials and workforce demand. (Matthew Smith, ECS, October 2012)
PER The Progress of Education Reform: Technology in Early Education 
The latest edition of The Progress of Education Reform, Technology in Early Education: Building Platforms for Connections and Content that Strengthen Families and Promote Success in School, outlines trends in digital media use by young children, examines effective teachers and libraries as partners, and provides guidelines for policymakers on building integrated technology platforms for early education. The paper, authored by Lisa Guernsey, Director of the Early Education Initiative at the New America Foundation, was featured at the 2012 ECS National Forum on Education Policy in a session on the appropriate use of technology in early childhood programs.
PER june 2012 The Progress of Education Reform: Understanding State School Funding
Many policymakers view their state's school funding formula not as a tool for reform but as a barrier to change. Policymakers tend to view the way that their state funds schools as a byzantine system of rules, regulations and formulas that is only comprehendible to a handful of people. When policymakers don't understand the basics of their state’s funding system, it is difficult for them to determine what changes are needed to encourage innovation. This issue of The Progress of Education Reform sets out to ease some of the confusion by helping readers better understand these complex systems, with the hope that this knowledge will be used to help support education reform in the states. (Michael Griffith, ECS, June 2012)
PER The Progress of Education Reform: Defining College Readiness
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform considers potential ways states might define “college readiness,” identifying for each approach: potential benefits, potential drawbacks and key components to consider. (Jennifer Dounay Zinth, ECS, March 2012)
PER The Progress of Education Reform: Civic Engagement through Digital Citizenship
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform includes a closer look at the characteristics of digital natives and provides a summary of research about digital natives' civic engagement habits and the implications of this research for education policy aimed at promoting digital citizenship for today’s youth. (Paul Baumann, ECS, February 2012)
2011 (click to expand/collapse)
PER The Progress of Education Reform: Pre-K-12 Literacy
This issue examines: 1) low Pre-K-12 literacy levels nationally, especially for low-income and diverse student populations; 2) trends in U.S. students’ reading proficiency since the 1970s; 3) the negative impacts correlated with low reading levels; and 4) policy recommendations for improving literacy instruction and achievement, particularly in the early grades. (Karen Schimke, ECS, December 2011)
PER The Progress of Education Reform: More on Pay-for-Performance
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform describes "pay-for-performance" (PFP) models and presents recent research findings and their implications for policy. It looks at PFP systems broadly and includes not only systems that provide rewards for increased student achievement, but also for other tasks such as engaging in professional development and taking on added roles and responsibilities. (Barbara Thompson and Paul Baumann, ECS, October 2011)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Higher Education Reform
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform looks at recent research in the areas of assessing student learning, the use of technology in instruction, and models for providing the academic and social support students need to stay on track and earn a postsecondary credential. (Bruce Vandal, Education Commission of the States, August 2011)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Credit Recovery and Proficiency-Based Credit
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform will address the following questions: 1) What is credit recovery? What is proficiency-based credit? 2) How is credit recovery different from traditional remediation? 3) Why does providing for these options matter for high school completion? 4) How widespread are these options across the states? And what do state policies look like? 5) What are the challenges in implementing credit recovery and proficiency-based credit programs? 6) What does the research say on the effectiveness of credit recovery and proficiency-based credit? 7) What are the essential policy components? (Jennifer Dounay Zinth, Education Commission of the States, June 2011)
per The Progress of Education Reform: A Promise Unfulfilled
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform examines inequities in how Title I funds are distributed, and proposes changes that address three key factors. (Michael Griffith, Education Commission of the States, April 2011)
per The Progress of Education Reform: STEM Performance
This issue of ECS’ The Progress of Education Reform identifies promising and research-based approaches for enhancing student interest and achievement in STEM disciplines, including approaches that come with a smaller state-budget price tag. (Jennifer Dounay Zinth, ECS, February 2011)
2010 (click to expand/collapse)
per

The Progress of Education Reform: Teacher Leaders
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform discusses the roles teacher leaders can play; how they can contribute to overall school and student success; how some states are formally supporting teacher leaders and the concept of teacher leadership; and policy implications and recommendations for state policymakers on how to explore and/or expand teacher leadership in their states. (Barbara Thompson, Dec. 2010)
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per The Progress of Education Reform: Citizenship Education
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform examines research on what constitutes citizenship education, how citizenship education contributes to the acquisition of 21st century skills and civic learning opportunity and achievement gaps. (Jennifer Piscatelli, Education Commission of the States, October 2010)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Investing in College Completion
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform summarizes recent research that may challenge conventional wisdom on how and where public resources for postsecondary education should be dedicated in an effort to increase college completion rates. Questions to be examined include: 1) How did changes in enrollments and the allocation of resources result in declining college completion rates in the United States? 2) Do shifting enrollments to community colleges save money in the long run? and 3) Can investments in student services rather than instruction increase college completion? (Bruce Vandal, August 2010)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Teacher Merit Pay
The idea of merit pay programs for educators has been around for several decades and it is starting to be implemented in a growing number of districts around the country. But we have to ask: What do we really know about the impact of merit pay on students? This issue of The Progress for Education Reform looks at what impact some of these merit programs have had on student learning. (Michael Griffith, June 2010)
per The Progress of Education Reform: End-of-Course Exams
In recent years, criticism of high school graduates' lack of readiness for college and work has led a number of states to raise high school graduation requirements — particularly in terms of the number and rigor of courses students must pass. This issue of The Progress of Education Reform addresses end-of-course assessments at the high school level. (Jennifer Dounay Zinth Zinth, April 2010)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Chronic Early Absence
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform looks at two recent research studies on the issue of chronic early absence and addresses the following: 1) What are the impacts of chronic early absence? 2) Why has it been overlooked? What contributes to chronic early absence? and 3) What can be done to reduce chronic absence in the early grades? (Mimi Howard, February 2010)
 
2009 (click to expand/collapse)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Service Learning
The term service-learning is used frequently these days, but confusion remains as to what it is and why it matters. More importantly, are there any measurable benefits? This issue of The Progress of Education Reform looks at four research studies that explore the impact of service-learning on student achievement and civic engagement. (JoAnn Henderson, December 2009)
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per The Progress of Education Reform: Transfer and Articulation
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform will look at recent research on transfer and articulation in light of the new movement to increase degree attainment by addressing the following three questions: 1) Do articulation agreements ease the transfer process and lead to degree attainment; 2) what are the factors that facilitate or impede transfer; and 3) how can four-year, baccalaureate-degree-granting institutions ensure that transfer students succeed? (Bruce Vandal, October 2009)

per The Progress of Education Reform: Middle Grades
The middle grades are in crisis. By state and national measures, student achievement gains realized in the elementary grades all too often diminish by grade 8. This issue of The Progress of Education Reform highlights key findings from recent research and publications on improving student success in the middle grades — and identifies actions states can take to translate these findings into sound policy. (Jennifer Dounay Zinth Zinth, August 2009)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Summer Learning
For a long time, the issue of summer learning has waited in the wings, like a fully prepared understudy, ready to jump in and take the stage should the star need a back-up. Recently, though, summer learning has moved into the spotlight — and at the same time, the script is changing. Instead of memorizing and mimicking the star’s lines, summer learning is writing its own script. Transcending the punitive and remedial model of summer school, summer learning’s new form is an artful blend of core academic learning, hands-on activities, 21st century skills, arts, sports and meaningful relationships. (Brenda McLaughlin and Jeffrey Smink, National Center for Summer Learning at Johns Hopkins University, June 2009)
per The Progress of Education Reform: International Benchmarking
If the United States wants to compete in the worldwide market again, “... it would have to adopt internationally benchmarked standards for educating its students and its workers, because only countries with highly skilled workforces could successfully compete in that market.” What is more important — teaching content or teaching skills? Do they have equal value? Should 21st century skills be taught separately or in concert with content? (Barbara Thompson, Education Commission of the States, April 2009)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Funding Dual Credit Programs
More than 87% of America's public high schools offer their students the opportunity to gain college credit prior to graduation. Learning opportunities that allow students to gain college-level credit often are referred to as "dual credit" programs, and they are experiencing a growth in both the number of students who take advantage of them and the number of schools that offer them. (Michael Griffith, Education Commission of the States, February 2009)
2008 (click to expand/collapse)
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The Progress of Education Reform: A Growing Population
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform looks at three recent research studies on academic success for Hispanic students and offers insights on strategies that show promise in promoting greater educational attainment for Hispanic students. (Jennifer Piscatelli, Education Commission of the States, November 2008)
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per The Progress of Education Reform: Community College Success
This issue of Progress of Education Reform looks at the latest research on student success in community colleges and offers insights on the strategies that show the most promise in promoting greater educational attainment for community college students. (Bruce Vandal, Education Commission of the States, September 2008)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Secondary STEM Education
The next generation of Americans will likely require a solid grounding in mathematics and science for their creativity to be maximized in a world increasingly dependent on technological advances for prosperity and security. As the majority of Americans do not earn a postsecondary degree, it is essential that students be given this solid grounding during the elementary and secondary years. (Kyle Zinth, Education Commission of the States, July 2008)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Counseling
This issue of Progress of Education Reform takes a closer look at research related to: 1) The variation in access of college counseling across schools and the impact of schools, districts, postsecondary institutions and states on the availability and type of college counseling; 2) The types of information traditionally underserved students need to prepare for postsecondary education; and 3) The varying types of guidance students receive based on their academic pathway or ethnic background. (Jennifer Dounay Zinth, Education Commission of the States, June 2008)
per The Progress of Education Reform: Developmental Education
Following three questions: 1) What are the challenges that developmental education programs face that affect their success? 2) Are developmental education programs an effective strategy for increasing college attainment rates? 3) How can state policy improve the success of developmental education programs?

per The Progress of Education Reform: Early Care and Education
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform addresses the policies and practices associated with sustaining school readiness and boosting achievement for young children throughout the early elementary years. All three studies support the notion that an aligned and coordinated set of policies and practices linking early learning with the early elementary grades will maximize a return on investments and help ensure later academic success.
2007 (click to expand/collapse)
  The Progress of Education Reform: Increasing Teacher Retention
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform highlights data and research on why teachers leave, how attrition affects teacher shortages across the nation and the importance of working conditions for student performance. It also includes links to additional resources on teacher attrition and teacher working conditions. (Tricia Coulter and Ashley Zaleski, Education Commission of the States, December 2007)
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  The Progress of Education Reform: School Improvement
This issue highlights recent research that explores what works in improving low-performing schools and districts, examines what is being learned from research and looks at the subsequent implications for state policy. (Kathy Christie, Education Commission of the States, November 2007)
  The Progress of Education Reform: Evaluating Teacher Effectiveness
This issue highlights recent research that attempts to explore the relationship between traditionally accepted measures of teacher quality – teacher certification and in-class performance – and teacher effectiveness as assessed through student academic performance. It also includes links to additional resources on teacher quality and teacher evaluation methods. ( Tricia Coulter, director, ECS Teaching Quality and Leadership Institute, October 2007)
  The Progress of Education Reform: Student Engagement
This issue of the Progress of Education Reform features highlights of K-12 research on student engagement, a civic orientation and building resiliency. Taken together, they provide a useful, up-to-date look at evidence on the merits of engaging students for achievement and success. It also includes policy implications based on the research, as well as links to studies and resources on student engagement in higher education. (Terry Pickeral, executive director, ECS National Center for Learning and Citizenship, and Jennifer Piscatelli, policy analyst, ECS National Center for Learning and Citizenship, September 2007,)
  The Progress of Education Reform: Economic and Workforce Development
One strategy for addressing the misalignment among postsecondary education, state workforce development programs and state economic development strategies is to create career pathways programs at community colleges where students are able to enroll in a defined track of coursework that leads to jobs in high-demand fields within a state or region. This issue of The Progress of Education Reform reviews four reports developed by the Workforce Strategy Center that make the case for states to implement policies that support the use of career pathways to increase college completion, and contribute to state and regional workforce demand. (Chris Spence, Education Commission of the States, August 2007)
  The Progress of Education Reform 2007: Dropout Prevention
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform summarizes the findings of five recent studies that address: 1) Early predictors for dropping out of school; 2) 9th-grade predictors of risk in an urban environment; 3) School characteristics linked to higher graduation rates; 4) Economic benefits of several programs that positively influence high school completion rates; and 5) A synthesis of the research on dropping out and the importance of state data systems to support dropout prevention efforts. (Jennifer Dounay Zinth, Education Commission of the States, July 2007)
  The Progress of Education Reform 2007: Same-Sex Schooling
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform digests the research on same-sex schooling. The review finds that the research on same-sex vs. coed schooling is copious, but remains far from conclusive. Included in this issue: 1) What the research says about same-sex schooling; 2) Details about the revised Title IX regulations; and 3) Links to other resources. (Suzanne Weiss, Education Commission of the States, January 2007)
2006 (click to expand/collapse)
  The Progress of Education Reform 2006: Mentoring
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform focuses on: 1) An overview of different types of mentoring programs; 2) Benefits and potential adverse effects of mentoring programs; and 3) Mentoring as part of schoolwide reform efforts. Summaries of four articles on mentoring and links to other websites are included. (Suzanne Weiss, Education Commission of the States, September 2006)
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  The Progress of Education Reform: School Facilities
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform focuses on: 1) Principles of educational design; 2) The impact of school environments on academic outcomes; and 3) The changing educational facilities needs of the 21st century. Summaries of four articles on school facilities and links to other Web sites are included. (Suzanne Weiss, Education Commission of the States, April 2006)
  The Progress of Education Reform 2006: Technology in Education
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform highlights several of the major influences and consequences of technology on education reform at the school, district and state levels. Included are discussions on the impact of one-to-one computing on teaching and learning, lessons learned from large-scale student-laptop programs and the possibility and proliferation of "digital learning spaces" in the near future. (Suzanne Weiss, The Education Commission of the States, January 2006)
2005 (click to expand/collapse)
  The Progress of Education Reform 2005: After-School Programs
Well-structured and comprehensive after-school programming is increasingly viewed as a unique and essential component of efforts to promote learning and social development for children of all backgrounds. This issue of The Progress of Education Reform summarizes three recent reports that provide useful insights into what is known – and what isn't – about the role, value and impact of after-school programs.(Education Commission of the States, November 2005)
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  Progress of Education Reform: Teacher Supply and Demand
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform focuses on the imbalances between teacher supply and demand – in certain subjects and certain school districts – attributable largely to significant numbers of teachers leaving their jobs for reasons other than retirement. It summarizes recent research including an analysis of urban district hiring practices, and their effect on applicant attrition and teacher quality, and an examination of the role of teacher turnover in school staffing problems, and the extent to which school characteristics and organizational conditions contribute to teacher turnover. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 6, no. 4, Education Commission of the States, August 2005)
  The Progress of Education Reform: Dual Enrollment
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform includes: 1) A review of existing research on the effectiveness of dual enrollment programs in increasing college access and success for a broad range of students; 2) An in-depth look at state dual enrollment policies, and how they affect the quality and availability of programs; and 3) An analysis of differing views within the higher education community on the role and value of college-level learning in high school. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 6, no. 3, Education Commission of the States, February 2005)
  The Progress of Education Reform: District and School Leadership
This edition of The Progress of Education Reform summarizes several reports and studies that provide a quick introduction to the issue of school leadership, including: 1) How – and the extent to which – the work of principals and superintendents affects student learning and school quality; 2) The utility and effectiveness of existing professional standards for school leaders; and 3) The emergence of new ideas about the nature, structure and responsibilities of school leadership. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 6, no. 2, Education Commission of the States, February 2005)
2004 (click to expand/collapse)
  The Progress of Education Reform: Science and Mathematics Education
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform focuses on what is more and more seen as a major stumbling block to change and improvement: the education, training and classroom practices of the nation’s K-12 science and math teachers. It summarizes recent research on the dimensions, causes and already emerging consequences of the problem, and looks at efforts under way at the national and state levels to address it. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 6, no. 1, Education Commission of the States, December 2004)
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  Progress of Education Reform: Kindergarten
While much research has been conducted over the past 25 years on the effects of full versus half-day kindergarten programs, definitive answers remain elusive. Recent research, however, including an extensive study tracking a national sample of children who began kindergarten in 1998, has helped shed light on the subject. This edition of Progress of Education Reform examines key findings of this new research. (Dale DeCesare, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 5, no. 4, Education Commission of the States, September 2004)
  Progress of Education Reform: Hispanic Achievement
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform summarizes several recent studies and analyses that shed new light on the dimensions, causes, and social and economic consequences of Hispanic underachievement. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 5, no. 3, Education Commission of the States, August 2004)
  Progress of Education Reform: Citizenship Education
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform focuses on what some of the latest research says policymakers can do to improve citizenship education, as well as what the National Assessment of Educational Progress has found about nationwide student civics achievement. (Dale DeCesare, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 5, no. 2, Education Commission of the States, 2004)
  Progress of Education Reform 2004: The Arts in Education
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform provides a brief summary of several recent research studies on the role and value of education in the arts, as well as a look at the results of National Assessment of Educational Progress tests in music, visual arts and theater. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 5, no. 1, Education Commission of the States, January 2004)
2003 (click to expand/collapse)
  Progress of Education Reform 2003: Educational Attainment
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform offers a brief review of recent research findings on the correlation between educational attainment and economic and social well-being. It also provides links to websites that feature state rankings on health, crime rates, voting participation, workforce preparation, per-capita income and tax revenues, and other key indicators. (Suzanne, Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 4, no. 2, Education Commission of the States, September 2003)
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  The Progress of Education Reform: Closing the Achievement Gap
This issue of The Progress of Education Reform provides summaries of the latest research on the causes, dimensions and effects of the achievement gap, along with links to other sources of information. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 4, no. 1, Education Commission of the States, March 2003)
2002 (click to expand/collapse)
  The Progress of Education Reform: School Size
Concentrates on recent research regarding the effectiveness of smaller schools in improving student performance. Several of the studies also address the economics involved with implementing small school reform. (Dale DeCesare, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 3, no. 3, Education Commission of the States, January-February 2002)
2001 (click to expand/collapse)
  The Progress of Education Reform: Charter Schools
Charter schools continue to provoke questions and debate as policymakers' questions intensify about the impacts of such schools. This issue briefly reviews research findings from recent reports, but key questions remain unanswered. (Todd Ziebarth, The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001, vol. 3, no. 2, Education Commission of the States, November-December 2001)
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  The Progress of Education Reform: High School Curriculum
Research shows that the kind and level of courses high school students take affects their performance on tests, their readiness for college-level work and their persistence toward a degree. Also looks at what a rigorous high school curriculum should look like. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001, vol. 3, no. 1, Education Commission of the States, August-September 2001)
  The Progress of Education Reform: Early Care and Education
Serves as a guide for policymakers who are considering implementing and/or reforming early care and education practices in their states. Raises issues and implications around curriculum alignment, school entry age, assessment and teacher training. (Adapted from papers written by Lillian G. Katz, The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001, vol. 2, no. 6, Education Commission of the States, June-July 2001)
  The Progress of Education Reform: School-based Management
Looks at findings from various research and evaluation studies over the past 10 years, profiles a Chicago urban school district and the state of Kentucky, which have nearly a decade of experience with this decentralized decisionmaking process. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, vol. 2, no. 5, ECS, April-May 2001)
  The Progress of Education Reform: Teaching Quality
Diverse, though somewhat disparate, factors that collectively have a substantial impact on the working environment and the job of teaching include parent involvement, safety concerns, class size, leadership issues, standards. (Wendy Wyman, The Progress of Education Reform, Education Commission of the States, vol. 2, no. 4, February-March 2001)
2000 (click to expand/collapse)
  The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001: Teacher Preparation and Induction
It is the end of "business as usual" for teacher preparation programs and now imperative to address what is considered essential elements of effective teacher preparation and induction programs. (Michael Allen, The Progress of Education Reform, Education Commission of the States, vol. 2, no. 3, October-November 2000)
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  The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001: Teacher Recruitment
Efforts to improve quality of teaching face numerous obstacles in such issues as teacher recruitment policies and practices, recruitment strategies, perceptions about teaching careers, hiring practices, and mobility and transferability of benefits. (Michael Allen, The Progress of Education Reform, Education Commission of the States, vol. 2, no. 2, August-September 2000)
  The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001: Accountability
Looks at performance-based accountability strategies, including holding students and teachers accountable for results, using rewards and sanctions for improving performance, and the quality of state academic standards. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, Education Commission of the States, vol. 2, no. 1, June-July 2000)
  The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001: Setting the Standard -- Will Higher Expectations Improve Student Achievement?
Reports on the latest research on the effectiveness of standards, how the movement gained ground yet many unanswered questions exist. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, Education Commission of the States, vol. 1, no. 5, January-February 2000)
1999 (click to expand/collapse)
  The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001: Reading
Provides state policymakers with a concise overview of crucial questions on improving student reading skills. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, Education Commission of the States, vol. 1, no. 4, November-December 1999)
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  The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001: Comprehensive School Reform
Points out the effect this reform effort has had on schools, districts and student achievement, and the importance of state and district support. (Lesley Dahlkemper, The Progress of Education Reform, Education Commission of the States, vol. 1, no. 3, September-October 1999)
  The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001: Youth Violence
Presents a look at three strategies that hold promise in addressing violent behavior – prenatal and infant care, small schools and service-learning. (Suzanne Weiss, The Progress of Education Reform, Education Commission of the States, vol. 1, no. 2, July-August 1999)
  The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001: School Choice
Looks at charter schools, open enrollment, home schooling and vouchers, and how public education has been impacted by these efforts. (Suzanne Weiss and Todd Ziebarth, The Progress of Education Reform, Education Commission of the States, vol. 1, no. 1, May 1999)
 

The Progress of Education Reform 1999-2001: Assessment
Looks at what we know and don't know about assessments, and using the right test. (Sherry Freeland Walker, The Progress of Education Reform, Education Commission of the States, vol. 1, no. 6, March-April 2000)

 

 
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