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National Forum 2006 Program — Concurrent Sessions

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Wednesday, July 12, 2006

10:00 AM -- 12:00 PM
click here for all sessions about early learning issues

Accountability for Pre-K Programs: Building Models to Support Investments (session #330)
Atrium 7, 2nd Floor
Over the past two years, states have increased funding for preschool by over half a billion dollars. In 2006, 12 governors endorsed the creation or expansion of pre-kindergarten programming. Now many states are faced with the dilemma of how to answer questions of accountability. This session will address the issue of linking outcome standards with assessment of program performance in implementing pre-K programming.



PARTICIPANTS

Tony Bennett, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Indiana Department of Education, Indiana

Holly Franks Boffy, 2010 Louisiana State Teacher of the Year, Paul Breaux Middle School, Louisiana

Jonathan Plucker, Director and Professor, Center for Evaluation and Education Policy, Indiana University, Indiana

Paul Reville, Secretary of Education, Executive Office of Education, Massachusetts

Philip Schmidt, Associate Provost, Western Governors University, Utah


10:00 AM -- 12:00 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Best Practices in School Improvement and Resource Allocation (session #331)
Atrium 6, 2nd Floor
What are high-performing districts doing to raise student achievement and how are resources efficiently allocated? Just for the Kids and Standard and Poor’s have developed best-practice frameworks for school improvement and resource allocation, respectively. Join representatives from these two organizations as they share implications for state policy in supporting more districts to adopt these best practices.



10:00 AM -- 12:00 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

What States Are Doing – and Not Doing But Should Be Doing – in High School Reform (session #332)
Edina Room, 2nd Floor
High school reform has become a critical issue in the wake of reports citing U.S. secondary students' shortcomings in international comparisons, and data from every corner of the nation illustrating American high school graduates' ill-preparedness for postsecondary study and the workforce. To address this need for reform, states have enacted many types of policies. What are these policies and how can they serve as models for other states challenged by high school reform?



10:00 AM -- 12:00 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Putting the Pieces Back Together: Disaster Preparedness and Response (session #333)
Atrium 1, 2nd Floor
Events over the past year illustrate the vulnerability of our society to natural and terrorist disasters. This workshop focuses on the role of state policymakers and education leaders to adequately prepare and respond to disasters. Participants will examine recent events and corresponding policies, practices and infrastructure to ensure schools are prepared for and able to effectively respond to disasters. In addition, participants will examine appropriate roles for student contribution to preparation and response to disasters. Policymakers from Mississippi will share their experiences and insights into why and how to create systems that engage all stakeholders in preparation and response.



10:00 AM -- 12:00 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Ensuring Healthy Learners (session #334)
Atrium 8, 2nd Floor
Minority populations within states and nationwide are disproportionately affected by disease and other health conditions caused, in part, by socioeconomic status and lack of access to quality health care. The recent volume of legislation related to student health and nutrition demonstrates that state policymakers recognize the importance of health in student achievement -- but schools alone cannot address major health care issues. This session will address options policymakers should consider to resolve health disparities and to address frightening increases in obesity and the onset of Type II diabetes in children.



10:00 AM -- 12:00 PM
Improving Math and Science Education: What State Policies Make a Difference? (session #335)
Atrium 4, 2nd Floor
With the new national imperative to improve math and science education – as well as reports linking students’ skills in these areas to America’s economic, technological and scientific global edge – how should states respond? Come to this session to learn how the federal government will be supporting state action, and what leading states are doing to both increase the number of students learning science and math and improve student achievement.



PARTICIPANTS

Barbara Clark, Assemblywoman, New York Assembly; ECS Vice Chair; Member, ECS Executive and Steering Committees; Board Member, NCLC; New York

Linda Darling-Hammond, Charles E. Ducommon Professor of Education, Stanford University, California


2:00 PM -- 3:30 PM
click here for all sessions about early learning issues

The Economic Case for Investing in Early Childhood Education: Implications for Policy (session #348)
Atrium 4, 2nd Floor
Quality early childhood programs cost money. With the unprecedented expansion of pre-K programs across the states comes rising concerns about how best to provide support. Financing early care and education is a high priority in most states today. The presenters of this session will discuss the long-term economic benefits of early education, present the supporting evidence and discuss strategies for financing state-supported pre-kindergarten programs.



2:00 PM -- 3:30 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Tackling Critical Education Leadership Challenges: Authority, Preparation and Conditions of Practice (session #350)
Atrium 7, 2nd Floor
This session will highlight what has been learned from the Wallace Foundation-funded ECS Leadership Issue Groups on topics such as the evaluation of principals, and the proper roles and authority of education leaders and their ability to control the flow of resources within districts and schools. The session will underscore the most challenging issues facing education leaders, such as how principals should be evaluated and compensated and whether they should have authority over school budgets.



2:00 PM -- 3:30 PM
click here for all sessions about postsecondary issues

Minority Students and College Success: Is Higher Education Up to the Challenge? (session #345)
Atrium 8, 2nd Floor
Demographic shifts have made it clear that higher education must grapple with how well institutions enroll and graduate minority students. While it is agreed that better preparation of students in K-12 education and student financial aid go a long way to improving college success rates, there is also some debate that the social challenges faced by minority students once they get to college can ultimately prevent attainment of degrees. Efforts such as the Gates Millennium Scholars and other scholarship programs have provided opportunities for many high-ability minority students to pursue both undergraduate and graduate degrees. Just as important as the programs themselves are the data they provide about the challenges these students face once they get into college. This session will be an honest discussion of what colleges and universities must do to increase the college attainment rate for minority students.



PARTICIPANTS

David S. Beard, Senior Associate, The Pew Charitable Trusts, District of Columbia

Allison de la Torre, The PEW Charitable Trusts, District of Columbia

Kristie Kauerz, Program Director, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Massachusetts

Jerry Weast, Superintendent of Montgomery County Schools, Maryland


2:00 PM -- 3:30 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

The Next 15 Years of Chartering (session #346)
Atrium 6, 2nd Floor
This will be an unconventional, provocative and perhaps controversial look at the future of what most of the country still refers to as "charter schools." In this new sector in public education it is possible to create new schools that are substantially different from traditional schools in their organization, leadership and approach to learning. We'll discuss seven key lessons from the last 15 years that will shape the coming stage of this state-led restructuring of public education.



2:00 PM -- 3:30 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

The New Age of Compensating Teachers (session #347)
Atrium 1, 2nd Floor
Diversifying the way teachers are paid – and in particular, paying teachers on some measure of performance – is gaining popularity as a possible vehicle to improve the quality of teaching, increase accountability, increase student achievement, and attract and retain quality teachers to where they are needed most. While much of the innovation regarding teacher pay has been at the district level, policymakers are looking at their role in creating policy innovations at the state level. This session will include a description of the basic elements and research on diversified teacher compensation systems and examples from a district and state with experience designing and implementing this type of pay structure.



2:00 PM -- 3:30 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Life After High School for Students with Significant Disabilities (session #349)
Edina Room, 2nd Floor
States are beginning to deal with the growing number of students with disabilities who, 30 years ago, might have been institutionalized. Now such students are completing high school and even college. These students include those with disabilities such as autism, Asperger’s syndrome or cerebral palsy. Participants will discuss how colleges and universities are adapting, issues surrounding whether there are jobs for these students, and what policymakers can do to ensure communities are ready for these students and students are ready to participate in their communities.



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Thursday, July 13, 2006

9:45 AM -- 11:30 AM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Evolution, Intelligent Design and the First Amendment (session #415)
Atrium 7, 2nd Floor
Efforts to include “intelligent design” in the public school curriculum have divided states and communities across the nation. What can policymakers do to address this conflict under the First Amendment? This session will examine the current state of the law, and explore the constitutional and educational issues surrounding the teaching of intelligent design in a public school. Is it possible for schools to teach this controversial subject matter? If so, how should it be done?



9:45 AM -- 11:30 AM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Easing the Transition from High School to Community College (session #416)
Atrium 4, 2nd Floor
Community colleges traditionally have been the primary access point into higher education for low-income or first-generation students. While an important role for community colleges is to provide remediation to students lacking key skills and knowledge, far too few of these remedial students ever complete a higher education program. Partnerships between high schools and community colleges are one key strategy for preparing prospective postsecondary students. These partnerships have the potential to align curriculum, provide information about the expectations of college, and offer support for students as they prepare academically and socially for education and training beyond high school. This session hopes to answer the question: How can high schools and community colleges effectively work together to increase college success?



9:45 AM -- 11:30 AM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Are We Using Value-added Assessment to its Greatest Potential? (session #417)
Atrium 1, 2nd Floor
"Growth" or "value-added" assessments that provide year-to-year results for individual students have captured policymakers' attention as they look for ways to improve student achievement and assess teacher effectiveness. However, there is a question as to whether these types of assessment systems are being used to their fullest potential for teacher quality. This session will explore the use of value-added assessment as a powerful diagnostic tool for measuring the effect of pedagogy, curricula and professional development on student achievement, and its potential for providing a fair and accurate foundation on which to build a new system of accountability.



9:45 AM -- 11:30 AM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Educating Native American, Alaskan and Hawaiian Students (session #418)
Atrium 8, 2nd Floor
Many states struggle with appropriate education strategies for native student achievement. This session will address the following questions: What are the current trends in native student achievement? How can state policies increase native student achievement? What pedagogies lead to increased student education aspirations and academic proficiency? What roles should the community play in motivating and educating native students? At this session panelists will share successful strategies to motivate and educate native students while ensuring cultural relevance, engaging the community and employing effective pedagogies.



9:45 AM -- 11:30 AM
Higher Education, Workforce Development and Global Competitiveness: What's the Relationship? (session #419)
Edina Room, 2nd Floor
Global competitiveness has created an interesting frame for examining the current state of higher education. While there has always been a connection between the economic vitality of states and their higher education institutions, the stakes have been raised as demand for highly skilled workers rises within a knowledge-based, global economy. Higher education has often been criticized for not being responsive to the rapid changes occurring in the marketplace, but many institutions have proven to be innovative through the creation of strong partnerships with business at the local, regional and international levels. This session will look at the “emerging policy triangle” of economic development, workforce development and higher education, and its implications for states and institutions. The session also will feature examples of business/higher education partnerships that have contributed to the economic competitiveness of their states.



9:45 AM -- 11:30 AM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Creating Longitudinal Data Systems To Improve Policymaking and Student Achievement (session #420)
Atrium 6, 2nd Floor
The Data Quality Campaign is a national collaborative effort to encourage policymakers to implement state longitudinal data systems to improve student achievement. Come learn how some states have successfully developed, implemented and used such a longitudinal data system to develop and refine state policies that are designed to support student achievement.



1:45 PM -- 3:45 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

State School Funding – What is Adequate? (session #430)
Atrium 4, 2nd Floor
Policymakers in many states are being forced to examine if their education funding systems are "adequate." This question of adequacy is often the result of a lawsuit or sometimes in response to higher state or federal education standards that schools and students are required to meet. Is this new focus on school funding adequacy good news for schools, states and students? A panel of national experts will discuss this issue.



1:45 PM -- 3:45 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

The State and District Role in Turning Around Low-Performing Schools (session #431)
Atrium 7, 2nd Floor
States and districts have taken different approaches to assisting low-performing schools (or those not meeting adequate yearly progress). In some cases, contractors have been hired to work in schools, others have set up assistance teams in state education agencies, and some states are relying on leadership academies to train turn-around teams or are assigning the responsibility to districts. State leaders will showcase what is working in their different state and district approaches and the challenges ahead.



1:45 PM -- 3:45 PM
click here for all sessions about postsecondary issues

Adult Education: The Other Education Challenge (session #434)
Atrium 8, 2nd Floor
With so much attention being placed on the traditional education pipeline and its implications for U.S. competitiveness in a global economy, considerably less attention is being paid to the other end of the education spectrum: adult learners. Recent reports detail how high percentages of adults in certain demographic categories lack the basic skills required to participate in today’s workforce. Data also indicate that 73% of people enrolled in higher education are not the traditional, full-time 18-to-24-year-old student, suggesting that there is a tremendous need to adapt our education systems to serve the large number of adults seeking a postsecondary education. This session will feature information on the current challenges that many states face in terms of educating their adult populations and strategies for how more coordinated state efforts can have an impact on the economic competitiveness of states.



1:45 PM -- 3:45 PM
click here for all sessions about postsecondary issues

Teacher Education and Community Colleges: A Revolutionary Innovation (session #435)
Atrium 6, 2nd Floor
As some states face a teacher shortage that could grow to approximately 2.5 million nationally by 2010, there has been momentum to expand and enhance the role of community colleges in teacher preparation. No longer used just for lower-division transfer courses, community colleges now offer baccalaureate degrees, post-baccalaureate degrees, 3+1 programs and alternative routes to teacher certification. Drawing from examples of each type of program, this session will discuss the impetus behind these programs, their strengths and challenges, the biggest barriers to success, and evidence of the impact these types of programs have on teacher education and supply.



1:45 PM -- 3:45 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Report and Recommendations of the Governor's Commission on the Arts in Education: A Call to Action (session #432)
Edina Room, 2nd Floor
As part of his two-year chairmanship of ECS, Governor Mike Huckabee created and chaired the Commission on the Arts in Education. This session will feature the report issued by the Commission, including the underlying principles for the governor’s focus on the arts in education, current research, policy examples and recommendations with a call to action. Join Arts in Education Commission members for a report of their work and a discussion on what needs to be done to ensure the arts are a part of the curriculum for all students.



1:45 PM -- 3:45 PM
click here for all sessions about pre-K to 12 issues

Developing Principals: Different Types of Principals for Different Types of Schools (session #433)
Atrium 1, 2nd Floor
A strategy for creating high-quality schools is to prepare principals using different approaches. This session will highlight work – funded by the MetLife Foundation – on how leaders are being prepared to become change agents through leadership academies and other nontraditional approaches. Panelists will reflect on who these modern leaders are in very different contextual settings than yesteryear, and will ask if traditional colleges of education can produce this new cadre of leadership.



 
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